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Fentoozler
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When installing an alcove tub...does the walls below the lip need to have some sort of fireproofing?
Sheetrock of some flavor?
CBU?
DenseShield/Armor
etc...


Might be State specific....I really have no idea.
 

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not 100% sure on that, I personally don't do tubs, but if memory serves me correctly I don't believe so...
 

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i have absolutely no idea, but i always say you can never be too safe.

unless someone was planning on wrapping themselves in bubble wrap while wearing football gear, then that might be being too safe but its a dangerous world out there.
 

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Here too.
 

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It mostly depends on the code and the inspector or how good you want to be. But anytime you run into a situation where fire can spread, for example, the basement through the subfloor cut out for the drain, into a wall cavity, up the wall cavity, to a "false ceiling or soffit" built above the tub and go unrestricted for the most part into an attic space, there is a high degree of probability if the inspector is worth his weight - you will be fire stopping it.

Balloon framing is the simplest example. Soffits over cabinets in kitchens is another. Usually where there are multiple ceiling heights coming together on a common framed wall, holes cut in plates or anywhere fire can spread from one floor to another, etc.
 

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unless you are talking about new construction, you probably don't have room to put anything on the studs. Most bathrooms I've seen have a RO so close to the actual length of a tub that if you put drywall or cbu on the wall you would not be able to slide the tub into the alcove.
 

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celtic,
if it is a common wall to another dwelling unit or apartment then 5/8 type x drywall is required behind the tub to provide the fire wall.
 

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Fentoozler
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Only if the walls below are balloon framed and no bottom/top plates exists.
Some of you guys are scary-psychic !

That is exactly the case.....and that was my opinion ~ but I do not know if it is a requirement.



unless you are talking about new construction, you probably don't have room to put anything on the studs. Most bathrooms I've seen have a RO so close to the actual length of a tub that if you put drywall or cbu on the wall you would not be able to slide the tub into the alcove.
Actually....I have too much room...have to build one wall out 3 1/2" [exterior balloon]....and another wall needs :censored: 1" [interior, non-load bearing, wet wall]
 

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It mostly depends on the code and the inspector or how good you want to be. But anytime you run into a situation where fire can spread, for example, the basement through the subfloor cut out for the drain, into a wall cavity, up the wall cavity, to a "false ceiling or soffit" built above the tub and go unrestricted for the most part into an attic space, there is a high degree of probability if the inspector is worth his weight - you will be fire stopping it.

Balloon framing is the simplest example. Soffits over cabinets in kitchens is another. Usually where there are multiple ceiling heights coming together on a common framed wall, holes cut in plates or anywhere fire can spread from one floor to another, etc.

Great Job. Could'nt have siad better myself. :thumbsup:
 

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Fentoozler
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
celtic,
if it is a common wall to another dwelling unit or apartment then 5/8 type x drywall is required behind the tub to provide the fire wall.
Nope..free standing SFH.


However....there is a multi-family row-type house we own that is going to need some major help.
I will stick to my own trade [electrical] for that job.

TY Catspaw :thumbsup:
 

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Nope..free standing SFH.


However....there is a multi-family row-type house we own that is going to need some major help.
I will stick to my own trade [electrical] for that job.

TY Catspaw :thumbsup:
batt insulation shoved in the stud and joist bay will meet the fireblocking requirement in your situation and meet energy requirements if it is an exterior wall. your welcome:thumbup:
 
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