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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I thought I'd recount this situation from another DIY site to see what you think. The OP was the unhappy client.

A contractor performed some interior remodeling for their client - about 50k of work, they say. Two months after work was completed, a leak was discovered. The plumber discovered a 2" trim nail (from nailing baseboard) had punctured a copper supply pipe that was running parallel to a stud and right behind the drywall (there was a bathroom on the other side, which was not worked on by this contractor). The pipe did not leak right away, taking two months to cause the damage downstairs.

The contractor will not accept "fault", instead blaming poorly located existing plumbing work. But they have begrudgingly agreed to pay for all damage and repairs. The client is still upset and has "lost confidence" in them (consideration for a future kitchen remodel) because the contractor is not admitting that it's their fault and taking full responsibility. Client thinks that if the trim carpenter had used a stud finder (as they learned by reading on the internet), this would have never happened, etc.

What do you think?
 

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Just answered this question to someone. Basically she wondered who's fault it was. There is really no way to tell what is behind a wall and any plumber, electrician, etc should put a nail stop anywhere their work is a questionable distance from the edge of the stud.

The only way I would blame the carpenter is if they were there as the GC and saw where all the pipes where. Or if there was a stub out and the carpenter nailed directly below it.

I have only hit one or two pipes ( pure luck) and one in particular was in a very odd place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm not seeing the issue? Most pipes in a bay are running adjacent to or parallel to the studs. Do you mean it was running perpendicular to the studs?
Parallel/adjacent to the stud (vertical pipe), but it wasn't deep in the wall (just right behind the drywall). When the baseboard was nailed, it got hit.
 

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If the carpenter missed the stud and hit the pipe it's the contractors fault, if he hit over a stud that was missing a nail plate and this caused him to hit the pipe it's the plumbers fault. IMO
 

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Nail plate won't stop anything outside of the stud. It only covers the stud
 

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Call it a box plate in texas.

Nail plate is meant for studs, installed with hammer and no fasteners.
2014-01-05-23-00-43-1477685718.jpeg
 

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I've never seen anyone use a 5"x8" nail plate. Only 1.5"x Plates. It sounds like it got hit above the bottom plate next to a stud.
 
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