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90%-er
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it advisable to use treated lumber for the bottom plate when framing out concrete basement walls for later drywall installation?

Floor is currently bare concrete. I've been pouring over the 'ole code book this morning, and can't find anything calling for it. I just had a customer ask about it and it got me wondering. I've never thought about it before.
 

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Hair Splitter
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Yes, it's the preferred way when framing with lumber.
Which should be the only way to frame a basement.

But even if I were forced to use metal studs, I would use a wood bottom plate. Never made any sense to me to install a metal bottom plate that looks and acts like a water trough. And if I am going to use a wood bottom plate might as well use wood for everything.
 

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I use it for a bottom plate, code says direct contact with masonry. If you use a sill seal then you can use regular lumber.

I would still use it as a sill just because basement can get water. I would personal also not use it all over the place. I find the material to be junk as it will distort and split as it dries out.

To each his own.
 

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Don
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Which should be the only way to frame a basement.

But even if I were forced to use metal studs, I would use a wood bottom plate. Never made any sense to me to install a metal bottom plate that looks and acts like a water trough. And if I am going to use a wood bottom plate might as well use wood for everything.
i have renovated condos where they were 8-15 years old and the steel stud was rotted out.

I highly Recommend to tapcon down your PT on your chalk line then build your wall and drop on top the PT.
 

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I've been pouring over the 'ole code book this morning, and can't find anything calling for it.
Did you use the index? It's under, wood, in protection against decay and termites.

2304.11.2.4 Sleepers and sills. Sleepers and sills on a concrete or masonry slab that is in direct contact with earth shall be of naturally durable or preservative-treated wood.
 

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Talking Head
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I would never use a PT plate, just isolate it. Are you gonna switch to HDG nails to nail them together..what about the drywall screws and trim nails that will corrode.
Not likely to be a problem with MCQ. I actually do use galv finish nails for base in basements, I also run a 2" strip of ply along the bottoms of the walls and start the drywall above that in the event that some water ends up down there. I build with the assumption that there WILL eventually be water in the basement.
 

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90%-er
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Did you use the index? It's under, wood, in protection against decay and termites.

2304.11.2.4 Sleepers and sills. Sleepers and sills on a concrete or masonry slab that is in direct contact with earth shall be of naturally durable or preservative-treated wood.
No, of course I didn't. That'd make too much damn sense. I learned to read books close to 30 years ago....still haven't gotten the whole thing down yet, apparently.

Anyway, I'm glad I asked the question regardless, because this has generated some other good advice. I always just Ramset down the bottom plate, but I'm thinking now we'll go adhesive first as an air seal. I like that idea.
 

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When I was doing frostwalls and basement developments full time for a builder. They rarely would send out any PT, we had to run poly under all our bottom plates.

I hated it because like some have mentioned I like to run a bead of PL down the wall and then put a bead around all my door openings.
 

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Pro
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We always use pt bottom plates and glue them down because of the infloor heat pipes. Don't wanna hit one of them with a concrete anchor. :)
 

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Noob question, but why would you want to seal an interior wall? A few people are saying they like the idea of using glue on concrete. The only time I've ever done this is when you have a half wall on concrete and you're not sure how well a powder gun is going to hold. I've pondered over the idea but still can't think of what sealing would accomplish if the air is going to be the same on both sides anyway.
 

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The obvious reasons for using it have been given already...but here is another reason we PT bottom then attach track.
When you install the base trim you have a nailer down low. ..trust me with so much metal track construction down here it is a pain in the &%@ when you know those trim nails are attached to air..
 

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Noob question, but why would you want to seal an interior wall? A few people are saying they like the idea of using glue on concrete. The only time I've ever done this is when you have a half wall on concrete and you're not sure how well a powder gun is going to hold. I've pondered over the idea but still can't think of what sealing would accomplish if the air is going to be the same on both sides anyway.
I don't think its a NOOB question at all.... and I don't think anyone has answereed it.

I'll glue for streangth ais necessary, and even leave weep holes in reegard to the sealing aspect......

If I have moisture between the foundation wall, I want a weep and whatever ventilation is available.
 
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