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Would like to know how you guys get your drywall and other sheet goods to the site? Do you look for a solution or just deal by shoving it into the work vehicle?
 

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Thanks. Marketing a new product for a client and looking to see how you guys transport and learn about the issues. Product carries it on the side of vehicle like glass. Seems like a solid product and looking for input.

Hate to admit it but jealous of you guys. I cant put a spam post in straight.
 

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In my van, on top of my van (if I had to), in a trailer or have it delivered. Would I carry it on the side....no.
 

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Young-Guy Framer
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Thanks. Marketing a new product for a client and looking to see how you guys transport and learn about the issues. Product carries it on the side of vehicle like glass. Seems like a solid product and looking for input.

Hate to admit it but jealous of you guys. I cant put a light bulb in straight.
Maybe I'm reading it wrong, but this sounds like a terrible idea.

Even if it were to work, I'm not sure you're making anyone's life easier. If it's a few sheets, it fits in my truck bed. More than a few? Delivered by the supplier.

I'd suggest you/your client ask some very honest questions to find out if this idea is worth pursuing before sinking a bunch of time/money into development, IP, and marketing.
 

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On the side of a van?!?!:laughing:



I prefer this method. Can't be hassled for a delivery charge.


You know Lowes does $20 delivery for commercial accounts right? Not to mention, our sheetrock supplier not only delivers for free but brings it in...

Be sure to tip...

Wouldn't bother making the trip for a couple of sheets for $20... especially since the customer is paying anyway...
 

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Anymore I tend to cut down the sheets, doing smaller jobs only.

But this may help for determining which way to go http://www.referwork.com/ref/how_much_does_drywall_weigh.htm

Delivery is little to pay especially when you have the thicker wallboard to contend with and non-straight paths. Too, makes starting the job easier when you haven't already lugged the stuff so far...there's always the option of renting the home center truck if you happen to buy it there.
 

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You know Lowes does $20 delivery for commercial accounts right? Not to mention, our sheetrock supplier not only delivers for free but brings it in...

Be sure to tip...

Wouldn't bother making the trip for a couple of sheets for $20... especially since the customer is paying anyway...

Late reply but I really hope you know I was joking.

If we need more then a couple of sheets of plywood we have it delivered. Unless we need it like right now and the flat bed or a trailer will do. We have around 1/2 a bunk of plywood in our container most of the time anyway, 1/2-5/8 or 3/4.

There was one time when I needed 40 sheets of 3/4 plywood to redeck a building. We didn't have enough at the shop so I went and put 30 in my pick up. Had we known that much would need to be replaced it would have been delivered.

No need for such a silly rack, what are you going to carry maybe 5 sheets of something per side?
 

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Thom
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Have it delivered on a boom truck and stocked in the rooms it belongs in.

Doing it myself is waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaayyyyyy to expensive.

I will pick up a sheet for a repair in a truck but for a job, delivery is a no-brainer.
 
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