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Remodeler
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Discussion Starter #1
I need to add some power to my trailer. When it rains and I cut inside I have to leave the doors open for the extension cord and things get wet.

I've been looking at ways to do a hookup. I know a marine system would do but they are so expensive. All I want is a safe way to run some outlets, and a light insode and plug in outside. Anyone have some simple safe way of doing this?
 

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DGR,IABD
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9,683 Posts
It sounds like installing a "flanged inlet" on the outside of the trailer, with a bubble cover would be the thing to do. This is the type of "shore power" connection featured on ambulances and fire trucks, and will do the trick for your tool trailer. Total cost would be around 30 bucks for the inlet and the bubble cover. If your cords don't have GFCI's built into them, I'd consider putting a GFCI receptacle inside the tool trailer to protect the receptacles in the trailer.
 

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MD's right. We had an electrician wire our trailer like a small workshop (switched overhead fluorescents, coupla GFCI protected covenience outlets) with an outside power 'inlet' like he described. All the wiring is in metal conduit so that it doesn't get beat up. It's really nice for the odd night time jobs and when the weather gets nasty. We also have an alarm that's monitored wirelessly that runs of a bank of golf cart batteries and a power inverter. A solar trickle charger does a pretty good job of keeping the batteries topped off.
 

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Electrical Contractor
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I've done a few for friends I race with with enclosed car trailers. I like PVC as it is a bit more "resilient". It will bend and bounce back as opposed to bend and stay that way.
Receptacles around, switch, OH vapor proof fluorescents, work bench receptacles.
Flanged inlet to a DPDT switch with an inverter on the other end and the trailer in the center position. This way they can go from batteries to shore power by simply throwing a switch.

Nothing is cookie cutter. They are all custom jobs, but most are similar in design.
 

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Speedy Petey said:
Flanged inlet to a DPDT switch...This way they can go from batteries to shore power by simply throwing a switch.
Great idea:thumbsup: My next trailer gets that. Thanks.
 

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Travel trailers have male/female plugs/outlets specifically made for this application. They are something like a 9 or 11 pin hookup.

Marine is different unless RV manufacturers have changed connections lately.
 

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DGR,IABD
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MinConst said:
Yeah, that's the "style" that me, speedy, and pipe are talking about, but NOT that one per se.

You just need the regular straight blade one for a regular extension cord. An "inlet" is the exact opposite of a receptacle. It has prongs instead of openings for prongs. You can't really get these at a home center, but you can pick one up at an electrical supply house.

Teetor mentioned a 9 or 11 pin connector. I believe he's thinking of the connector for the lights and electric brakes, since no such connector exists for short power for a travel trailer or RV. RV's and travel trailers do use specially configured cord connectors for shore power, but they are 3 or 4 pin. You really don't want to do anything "special" for your tool trailer. You should set things up so that you can plug up with ordinary extension cords on any jobsite.
 

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Remodeler
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Discussion Starter #10
I have the trailer all set now. GFCI at the start and enough outlets to cover what I need. All in plastic conduit. It came out nice. Thanks for the help.
 
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