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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

I've been having a major issue with my master padlocks freezing up. Some mornings I can't even fit the key into the lock. Even if I do the shackle will be frozen in place

Then once I do get the locks off the doors are so frozen I have to really force them open. I feel like something will eventually break from stress. Moreover, I can't figure out where all the moisture is coming from...

What are you guys doing to prevent this? Most mornings I've resulted to taking propane torch to the side door.
 

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Spray some lube in it and it won't freeze up.
 

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Usually in this weather I keep my mapp torch behind the front seat. It makes quick work of those frozen trailers and locks:laughing: Just so my front door locks don't freeze!



Dave
 

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been having the same problem here the other day. Moisture is from the high humidity in the air and really cold temps. A silicone spray or a high oil type spray is the best I believe. If not mistaken WD 40 has a fair amount of water in it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was afraid that a torch was my only option...

My padlocks are wrapped in rubber so its a pain to heat them without melting/ catching fire to everything.

Ive tried all sorts of spray. Nothing seems to work for me...
 

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I put an epdm flap over my semi trailer pad locks, along with doing a teflon lube soak about every 5 years or so. The locks are about 20 years old, & never freeze up even though they face the worst weather direction. Before the epdm flap, they froze up all the time.
For the door itself, try using "Sil Glyde" silicone grease.
http://www.agscompany.com/lubricants/automotive/168

It'll repell any water. It's a common automotive lube made for door seals & such.

Joe
 

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Wd40 is formulated to displace water, & is what you should use to drive the water out. That's what the WD stands for...water displacement. But it's too light a lube for any long term protection.
Joe
 

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I guess I should also add, if you do use a torch. Make sure you spray some wd-40 or graphite lube into the lock after you torch it.

It seems like torching burns all the existing lube off.


Dave
 

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My mechanic sprays all the locks on my tonneau cover and truck with something from BG every oil change, never have frozen lock.
 

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I was having problem with my toolbox locks freezing up, so I just got a can of lock de-icer at pep boys. Works like a charm.
 

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Joseph A. Capece
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WD-40 is just fish oil & diethyleither. No water.
From their website:

Myth: WD-40 contains fish oil.
Fact:
Consumers have told us over the years that they have caught some of the biggest fish ever after protecting their fish hooks and lures with WD-40. We believe this legend came from folks assuming that the product must contain fish oil since it appears to attract fish. Sorry Charlie®, it just ain’t so.

WD-40 Company has taken steps to respect and conserve the environment, and encourages its users to do the same. While WD-40 can be used to help protect fishing equipment from rust and corrosion, WD-40 Company does not recommend using WD-40 to attract fish.
 
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