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Also if you do any grading tracks are second to none. We grade large areas with loose stone, using a rubber tire on that just ruts and turns a job that would only take a couple passes into a small headache trying to be perfect.
 

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If you can't use a track machine on that little sloped hill wet, dry or muddy, sell it or find a good operator.

Tracks for me, but a tire machine is best if you are using a breaker on it, they do take the vibration out. Although, I just bought a new S650 for a large demo job, that will pay for the machine.

If you buy one get a Takeuchi track machine. My company doesn't have one, just Bobcat and Cats, but ran my son Takeuchi 130, nice machine.
 

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Love me some Concrete
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Discussion Starter #23
No way would I get anything but a Bobcat, have a great dealer in my town that I would never leave for another company. Plus, I like the new cab on the Bobcat the best and sitting in it for hours, the cab comfort and size is a big deal.
 

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HardWorks said:
If you can't use a track machine on that little sloped hill wet, dry or muddy, sell it or find a good operator. Tracks for me, but a tire machine is best if you are using a breaker on it, they do take the vibration out. Although, I just bought a new S650 for a large demo job, that will pay for the machine. If you buy one get a Takeuchi track machine. My company doesn't have one, just Bobcat and Cats, but ran my son Takeuchi 130, nice machine.
What would have been your magic trick for getting up the slope. 3 people including a guy who uses them day in day out couldn't even get it up the slope. No traction is no traction. It dont matter if your the best skid steer driver on the planet you ain't getting them up a wet muddy slope.

My neighbor had the same response as you and said I should go back to my day job. He gave it the big one about driving them for years and he went backwards further than he did forward.

I even tried using the concrete breaker to wedge the breaker 12" in the dirt. Didn't do nothing but pull the breaker right through the dirt as I slide backwards down the hill.
 

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A lot of your track life will depend on how you operate the machine. If you cut 180 hard turns all day on any surface, you will wear them tracks out in no time. If you do it on pavement, life is going to be even less.

It honestly is not much different than tires. Think ahead, and you will see tires and tracks last a lot longer.
 

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What would have been your magic trick for getting up the slope. 3 people including a guy who uses them day in day out couldn't even get it up the slope. No traction is no traction. It dont matter if your the best skid steer driver on the planet you ain't getting them up a wet muddy slope.

My neighbor had the same response as you and said I should go back to my day job. He gave it the big one about driving them for years and he went backwards further than he did forward.

I even tried using the concrete breaker to wedge the breaker 12" in the dirt. Didn't do nothing but pull the breaker right through the dirt as I slide backwards down the hill.
I have machines running 30-40% slopes all the time, wet, mud, cobble. Never met a man who ran a skid steer for more than a day, say that they couldnt operate a skid steer. Slopes, bad conditions, etc. and they get out of machine and say can't be done. Then an operator gets on it and does it.

Not trying to knock any one, but you put a man on that machine that is an OPERATOR and that wet grass, etch is not an issue. Hell, most times we don't break out the d-4 or d-5 for slope grading anymore as the skid steer is there, has more power, weights less and is more versatile.

But what do I know.

To the OP. On dirt only or most of the time, tracks. On pavement or slabs get tires. You can always get tracks for the tires and it also adds belly weight to the machine if you need the ass.
 

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HardWorks said:
I have machines running 30-40% slopes all the time, wet, mud, cobble. Never met a man who ran a skid steer for more than a day, say that they couldnt operate a skid steer. Slopes, bad conditions, etc. and they get out of machine and say can't be done. Then an operator gets on it and does it. Not trying to knock any one, but you put a man on that machine that is an OPERATOR and that wet grass, etch is not an issue. Hell, most times we don't break out the d-4 or d-5 for slope grading anymore as the skid steer is there, has more power, weights less and is more versatile. But what do I know. To the OP. On dirt only or most of the time, tracks. On pavement or slabs get tires. You can always get tracks for the tires and it also adds belly weight to the machine if you need the ass.
So explain how you get it up the slope if your an "operator" lol. Is there a magic button? It ain't a F1 car with 3000 settings. Its forwards, backwards, left and right. If you have no traction you have no traction. ohhhhh it must be that button that says press for extra traction lol. My neighbor must have forgot about that button too.
 

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There ain't no button on a hammer, but some are better than others with one. Like I said there are operators and than there are OPERATORS.

I could see if it were tires, not tracks.
 

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Most of our skid steers are tracked for a site in the dirt and have been phasing in that direction for quite some time. We have a few tires left, mostly for pavement and slabs. I've become rather partial to the new John Deere tracked skid myself.

And our operators are OPERATORS, from the IUOE :thumbsup:
 

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HardWorks said:
There ain't no button on a hammer, but some are better than others with one. Like I said there are operators and than there are OPERATORS. I could see if it were tires, not tracks.
so you're keeping it a secret how to get traction on a wet grassy slope. Guess us lower case operators will have to just do without your skilled knowledge of how to get traction when there is none.
 

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Weight.

I wouldn't say low class, just not experienced and that is ok. But arrogance because you don't know will kinder your life not just getting a stupid piece of equipment up a bump.

If I had images instead of print images of how we got concrete up in the mountains in Utah for a project for the big G, you'd clam up and listen. D-8s, cables and trench boxes.

If your tracks are slipping, the machine has the power, not the weight. That is why one guy said backwards. Load the bucket for weight don't juice it and let it crawl.

Ever see a dozer running along a slope and think, "Man that thing is going to roll!"? Nope belly weight and letting it crawl.

My operators, LU 845, 542 and 13 are bad ass when they need to be. Sometimes they impress even me, and I have been around a bit and have seen goats screw.

Lessons start at three fifty.
 

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I have a buddy that tried the over the tire tracks. I don't know what brand the tracks were the skidsteer was a bobcat, they really killed the tire life.
 

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I have a buddy that tried the over the tire tracks. I don't know what brand the tracks were the skidsteer was a bobcat, they really killed the tire life.
To loose. Been there. Tires slip in the tracks. Yes it tears them up.

Tracked tires aren't tracks but it helps and adds the belly weight needed sometimes.
 

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Since no one is bringing up the first thing I see in the picture. Why in the hell did your operator leave the bucket there in the first place? Part of being an operator is planning and thinking ahead. 1 why would you leave an attachment in the middle of everything and not off to the side? 2 Why leave it pointed in a direction that you need to get below it to hook up? After all, slope gets wet, your screwed. You need the weight of an attachment on most skid steers to travel any poor conditions. 3 Why hasn't your operator figured out how to grab the bucket from the uphill side? A chain in a jam to drag and spin from a better location. Forks or even hammer to grab bucket from the top side are another option.
 

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Not to get in the middle of operator or OPERATOR discussions, but different areas have different soil types and different tractions.

I have seen areas in Illinois where people get trucks stuck on flat ground. I would have never believed it if I hadn't seen it.
 

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Not to get in the middle of operator or OPERATOR discussions, but different areas have different soil types and different tractions.

I have seen areas in Illinois where people get trucks stuck on flat ground. I would have never believed it if I hadn't seen it.
Like you say if they had experience using the machines in different conditions they should know this. I have had them in mud half way up the tracks on a slope 5x steeper than what was in my back yard without an issue but Rain+grass+slope+Clay you aint going anywhere no matter how good you think you are.

When the owner who has over 20k hours in skid steers decides to give up after 20mins and tow it out you know its stuck.

Whats funny is the slope is pathetic. I mean its hardly any slope and i would never have thought it would cause an issue with a tracked machine.
 

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Since no one is bringing up the first thing I see in the picture. Why in the hell did your operator leave the bucket there in the first place? Part of being an operator is planning and thinking ahead. 1 why would you leave an attachment in the middle of everything and not off to the side? 2 Why leave it pointed in a direction that you need to get below it to hook up? After all, slope gets wet, your screwed. You need the weight of an attachment on most skid steers to travel any poor conditions. 3 Why hasn't your operator figured out how to grab the bucket from the uphill side? A chain in a jam to drag and spin from a better location. Forks or even hammer to grab bucket from the top side are another option.
There were 4 attachments that needed to be moved. The bucket was the last one and it was too dangerous to send the machine back down the slope. It would have slid right into the neighbors back yard. It was also very hard pulling a machine that was only 3" less wide than the gap it had to go through on a slope that was like ice so sending the machine back down to get the bucket was not worth the risk. Also the ground around the bucket is flat. Had to tell from that pic. Here's a better pic image-556105117.jpg


image-1234524512.jpg



Looks way better now I can get traction though.



image-679706047.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #40
We have alot of clay around here, a little bit of mositure and it is like an ice skating rink! Thats what got me started thinking about tracked. I slid into a ravine because of the clay, it's ridiculous!
 
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