Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

To trap or not trap condensate drain?

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
853 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On the same roof top, I see some units with a straight reversed L pipe and some units with traps.


The water in trap keeps the indoor air from flowing out, but water always remains at the level of the pipe and keeps stagnant water in the condensate pan and promote corrosion...
 

·
NICKTECH
Joined
·
273 Posts
On the same roof top, I see some units with a straight reversed L pipe and some units with traps.


The water in trap keeps the indoor air from flowing out, but water always remains at the level of the pipe and keeps stagnant water in the condensate pan and promote corrosion...
on package systems the blower is in front of the coil, placing the coil and drain pan under a negative pressure. the suction will draw outside air in through the drain not only adding to the load, but more importantly draws a mass of air through the drain pulling the drain water away. this allows for the pan to overflow. installing a trap will block the air from pulling the drain water away from the drain. as long as condensate is being removed then the water in the trap wont be stagnant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
Condensate Trap Articles

Here are some links to articles on condensate traps. Some will download pdf files. The articles point out problems with incorrect trapping.


Condensate Traps Jan 1, 2001 HPAC Engineering

Web Site video page for Cost Gard Traps on different trap problems Go to the bottom of the page for the videos. Cost Gard is the drain trap specified by WalMart and Walgreen Stores. An expensive drain to purchase but will pay for itself by preventing water damage. The last couple of videos show the Cost Gard installed.

Condensate Trapping Don’t Get Caught in a Trap of Your Own.

ASHI Reporter article “Let’s Concentrate on Condensate”
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
on package systems the blower is in front of the coil, placing the coil and drain pan under a negative pressure. the suction will draw outside air in through the drain not only adding to the load, but more importantly draws a mass of air through the drain pulling the drain water away. this allows for the pan to overflow. installing a trap will block the air from pulling the drain water away from the drain. as long as condensate is being removed then the water in the trap wont be stagnant.
thats what I was gonna say:))
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top