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I've recently been helping my local Habitat for Humanity by supervising some roofing. 3-tabs, nothing exotic, done about 10 roofs, but I'm not a roofer by trade.

Had a local roofer on site and he said we needed to add a layer of tar under and on top of the starter row. News to me, but time is cheap with free labor so I've been doing it. The other volunteers hate it and want it stopped (they don't like getting dirty, tar is VERY dirty).

Would like to hear some other opinions.
 

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If I am correct to assume youre in FLorida, The High wind velocity code requires roof cement at ALL roof edges, penetrations, valleys, etc. The "tar" is meant to keep the leading edge down for high wind circumstances. If the leading edge goes, there goes the roof with it. I say TO TAR.
 

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We also volunteer for Habitat and this is a new one on me. Dig around in here http://www2.iccsafe.org/2004_florida_codes/ and see what you can find. Chapter 9 covers residential roofing. There is also a seperate section relating to the high velocity wind code.
 

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I believe that cementing edges is a Florida thing. I do Habitat for Humanity jobs almost every year and simply comply with local codes. We find that it is faster to just roof them ourselves and skip the volunteer labor. By the time we get the volunteers sorted out and going on the roof, we could have finished it ourselves.
Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #5
And the winner is...

TAR!!!

Okay, checked that fine print in the back of the code. In high wind areas, 8" layer of roofing adhesive not more than 1/4" thick...required at all eaves, peaks, valleys.... In Florida, there is no excuse not to build to the high-velocity wind specs. Thanks to those who replied
 
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