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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering if I am prefabbing walls in the best way possible or if there are better ways out there. I am talking about building walls at the job site, but not on the deck and swinging them with the crane or forklift. I only prefab walls if I am framing a slab on grade and I cant sheet the walls on the ground because of pipes sticking up or if I am framing a huge ( 12000 sq ft+) building.
The way I do it:
I get all of my studs, corners, headers, sills, etc in one central location and build one wall. There is nowhere to nail the bottom plate to square it so I square it with the sheeting using factory to factory on the first wall. Then I build a wall directly on top of that wall and now I can tack the bottom down to square the wall. And I build wall on top of wall to a reasonable height and then start a new pile...
I imagine that there is some kind of square jigs that I could make so I could build the wall in that jig and it would be perfect squared every time. I think that I would have to move the walls away from that spot though and that would be an extra step to move and restack...
It would be easier to deal with if you didn't sheath the walls but I feel like it is waaay slower to sheath walls when they are standing and I think that the top plate would come off if the crane picked a wall up that wasn't sheathed.
Any tips or methods on how to do this in the most efficient way possible?
 

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You could hire me to do your framing :thumbup:. That would save you all kinds of headaches :laughing: I frame and stand them where they go. P&L, then sheet. I would argue that it's faster than the way you do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You could hire me to do your framing :thumbup:. That would save you all kinds of headaches :laughing: I frame and stand them where they go. P&L, then sheet. I would argue that it's faster than the way you do it.
I frame and stand them where they go on normal houses. I am only talking about houses on slabs or huge apartment complexes. I think that it is faster to prefab walls on these projects. I haven't actually done the side by side test to see if it is or not though so I could be wrong. I would say with 90% certainty that sheathing and tyveking walls on the ground is way faster than doing it in the air. I feel like anything that you can do on the ground is WAY faster than anything that you can do in the air.
 

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I stack my scaffold planks to make an assembly table 8" tall and frame the walls on them. With the studs on the table the overall height is 11-1/2" tall and you can easily walk over the assembly station or work on something in the middle of the wall easily too. Taking 8" of "Bend-over" out of wall day is a big relief, and sometimes we get to work in the shade. I leave out plumbing walls or extremely tall walls, also "T" blocks and Corner backing, and most double plates until stood and usually sheath latter too. To reduce site clutter, the only build-up we do is precut headers and trimmers, no stacks of different components taking up space and in the way.

I try to set up in the shade and stack the wall panels toward the foundation site, or if the slab is already there just carry them to their place. The wall tables consolidate the trash in one area near the drop and I do the lay-out on horses and cut all 6' or less cuts with a "Constantly On" CMS nearby. Then once the walls are stood the guys P&L, fill in T's & corners, window sills, sheath and cab blocks as I get the stairs, joists, and rafters cut.

Lots of tricks, try to use the best ones to suit the job and the manpower.

,,,
 

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I'd cut the pipes and frame it in its place.:laughing:

Anyhow, a couple situations I've encountered like this...I either left off the sheet where the pipe(s) were and still built it in place, or propped it up after some other sheets has kept the wall square.

If I had to build the walls away from their location and was unable to square-up easily...I have before, nailed the plywood(4 corners) to the top and bottom Only, then finished nailing after it was stood and plumbed.
 

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Build a prefab floor. On the road, dirt, where ever it fits. Set up a pile where you can slide them right off and stack them. Tack them together and away you go.

We generally don't prefab a lot of exteriors. On larger jobs we most likely will be. Town houses we build interior walls and party walls commonly.

These were built on steel beams and stacked and moved. Keeps guys busy and out of the way.
 

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I was wondering if I am prefabbing walls in the best way possible or if there are better ways out there. I am talking about building walls at the job site, but not on the deck and swinging them with the crane or forklift. I only prefab walls if I am framing a slab on grade and I cant sheet the walls on the ground because of pipes sticking up or if I am framing a huge ( 12000 sq ft+) building.
The way I do it:
I get all of my studs, corners, headers, sills, etc in one central location and build one wall. There is nowhere to nail the bottom plate to square it so I square it with the sheeting using factory to factory on the first wall. Then I build a wall directly on top of that wall and now I can tack the bottom down to square the wall. And I build wall on top of wall to a reasonable height and then start a new pile...
I imagine that there is some kind of square jigs that I could make so I could build the wall in that jig and it would be perfect squared every time. I think that I would have to move the walls away from that spot though and that would be an extra step to move and restack...
It would be easier to deal with if you didn't sheath the walls but I feel like it is waaay slower to sheath walls when they are standing and I think that the top plate would come off if the crane picked a wall up that wasn't sheathed.
Any tips or methods on how to do this in the most efficient way possible?
I think if you are coming to the interweb with these questions you might be in trouble. good luck

I would love to help, but I need pictures


Cut the pipes off and just build them in place
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think if you are coming to the interweb with these questions you might be in trouble. good luck

I would love to help, but I need pictures


Cut the pipes off and just build them in place
No reason to say something stupid like that. I am not coming to a forum because of inexperience. I am coming because I would like to know if there is anybody out there that has the most efficient way possible. I guess youre so badass that you don't need to evolve or take anybodys input. Must be nice.
 

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slowsol said:
Most big jobs around here get panelized at the lumber yard or factory.
That's the way it was for me on those duplexes a couple years back. Seems to me I would either just stick them or find a clear space on the slab.
 

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2x6, hilti/ramset into street

2x6-8 re-bar'd into ground if it's flat enough

or sheet the first wall square, then build on top of that

Use 2"x6" gang nails, or strapping from lumber loads, at lifting points so your plates don't separate from studs.

... keep a corner of the slab clear, mass frame there, and stack walls right off the slab , would be mine suggestion too.
 

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Is squaring your wall the only problem? In the past I've hooked a stringline to the bottom plate and left it on as I square and sheet the wall, that way if it gets kicked out of straight I will see it, I double check everything too before I nail off. I hope you're not using the plywood to square your walls, there's no jig either. Only real way to square a wall is the old fashion two diagonals across the entire wall.
 
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