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aluminum is a metal, fwiw.
That's funny, Lomanco shows a painted aluminum vent and a painted galvanized vent with two different model numbers.

If you pick up an aluminum vent then a galvanized vent of the same size and brand the galvanized vent will weigh more. If the weight is to close to determine a magnet will tell you which is which, fwiw.

The simple point I was trying to make was although both may let out air at the same rate the ALUMINUM vent will show more hail damage than the GALVANIZED vent.
 

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Aaron,

As a business "sole proprietor", there is a way around the not working on the jobs supposed rule. I did it, and worked with my alter ego union company for several years until I got tired of the travel hassles with the kind of new construction I was into. PM me if you want more information.

Then there is this side of the coin to consider also;

If you operate a corporation, then you are not the "owner", but just an employee.

Ed
Wouldn't you be the "President" if you own a corporation?
 

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It's the Certainteed's laminte shingle.

Been putting on more and more ridge vent lately but still aren't convinced with it. Over the past few years have learned that as little plastic on the roof the better, most ridge vent is plastic. Try to install ridge vent in the middle of Winter with a nail gun.

Since last Fall I've switched my felt over entirely to Certainteeds Roofers Sellect 15#. It cost almost double what I can buy felt for in the big box store but I like running Certainteed Winterguard and Roofers Sellect. Lays flat, needs less tacks, rarely blows off, and doesn't get wavy when wet.
I don't use a nail gun on ridge vent....first place to get a blow off and it's the first place you'll get get a blow through with a gun.

I'll defintely try the Certainteed 15#...thanks
 

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We operate as a corp.
In definition you are an employee and the president or VP or whatever title you want. These terms are just for tax purposes. I would recommend being a corp to anyone. It's just simpler in the end.

It really doesn't matter because you are still the owner. It just depends on how you set up your supposed shares and percentages of the company.
 

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Wouldn't you be the "President" if you own a corporation?

Dougger,

I stated that if you "Operate" your company as a corporation, not own it or be the President of it.

As MJW stated, you can be any title in the corp you decide or not even be on the paperwork. Some have their wives or a minority as the corporate officers, just to get priviledged bidding circumstances available to those classifications of jobs.

All you are is an "Employee" of the corporation, no matter what title you may have. Pretend that the corporation is "John Smith" corp. You just work for John Smith, thats all.

Ed
 

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The government offers special priveledges to minority classification contractors. Thats the rules set up, so if I could take advantage of those rules, I certainly would. Not being in that category has never hurt my business, but that is not the type of work I pursue.

Ed
 

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though i do mostly trim and finish carpentry now, i still do a fair amount of roofing. i run a starter across the bottom and up the sides with a 1" overhang, cutting each shingle when it gets to the end i use another shingle as a straight edge to line up with the starter (easy to show, hard to describe). i also run a 45 pattern with all my shingles. i use a five inch reveal. using a 45 pattern you can do a full nail off without having to stop and lift a shingle to hit a blind nail. like grump stated, quality is much better than quantity. i do like him and stack the ridge and then feed off a bundle next to me. you will get faster as you get older, but learn to do it the BEST that you can.
I do it much like you,but I use a 6"offset and overhang about 1 1/2 at the eaves.But here we don't use drip,nobody does.(Thats another debate)As far as other secrets,I keep lots for just me to know.I've taught to many people and then they quit and try to start their own company.Their are many things that only years of experience can teach you.Work smarter,not harder:thumbsup:
 

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I do it much like you,but I use a 6"offset and overhang about 1 1/2 at the eaves.But here we don't use drip,nobody does.(Thats another debate)As far as other secrets,I keep lots for just me to know.I've taught to many people and then they quit and try to start their own company.Their are many things that only years of experience can teach you.Work smarter,not harder:thumbsup:

:eek:Why not?
 

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Another B.C boy,how you doing?Do you use it or you just looking to start another debate?:rolleyes:
 

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Fastest way I know of shingles getting applied is to hire a kick a$$ roofer. If it's a guy I know I don't even have to be on the job.
 

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No snow yet, so doing good so far.:thumbsup:

I do use it and can't imagine not.

So I'm curious.
Ice damning isn't an issue here.I've been roofing 20 yrs and have only tore off maybe 3 or 4 roofs with drip edge on.Out of all of the other tear-offs I have done,no rot has occured because of lack of.Its a regional thing 4-sure.If it was needed I would use it.Now if I lived in say..Winterpeg,I would most definetly use it.If it ain't broke,don't fix it.I've done lots of inspected jobs as well,no drip in specs.
 

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Imo rake drip is a waste as well serves no real purpose unless you reroofing something that needs to be concealed. I dont use it on the low end either but at least there it is designed to support the lower edge. I also dont think you need to put ices shield up the rake edges and hips but manufacturers like to promote all of their products.
 

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Ice damning isn't an issue here.I've been roofing 20 yrs and have only tore off maybe 3 or 4 roofs with drip edge on.Out of all of the other tear-offs I have done,no rot has occured because of lack of.Its a regional thing 4-sure.If it was needed I would use it.Now if I lived in say..Winterpeg,I would most definetly use it.If it ain't broke,don't fix it.I've done lots of inspected jobs as well,no drip in specs.
So when I come next year to replace the soffit and fascia, I am forced to use a sill trim to conceal the top edge of the aluminum fascia. If I happen to put it even just the tiniest bit higher than the edge of the sheathing, chances are the sill will get damaged or ripped off the next time the roof is torn off.

Imo rake drip is a waste as well serves no real purpose unless you reroofing something that needs to be concealed. I dont use it on the low end either but at least there it is designed to support the lower edge. I also dont think you need to put ices shield up the rake edges and hips but manufacturers like to promote all of their products.


IMO the drip offers just that little extra protection for the exposed edge of the sheathing. Water and driving rain do very funny things sometimes.
 

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seriously, that doesn't make any sense. You have to have drip to cover the plywood edge and to receive any aluminum fascia, how do you hide the edge of the plywood?
 

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Its wierd to me because we dont have exposed sheathing ever. The fascia boards are set flush with the top of the sheathing. And anytime Im doing siding I put a return on my last bend by the shingles that help support that edge.
 

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so you must have a sub-facsia and then another wood fascia? what supports the plywood when it comes into contact with the wood fascia?
 
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