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Somebody should tape my brother in law feeding me Landmarks when we both get into it. He's one the best bundlers I've ever seen and our best record with him bundling for me is 9sq 1 bndle an hour 5 minutes.

We average 5-6sq an hour quite often. When you do it for so long you find ways to do it better.

Here's how I run up a gable roof with Landmarks. Put the first bleeder or starter shingle (metric) up and down so the overhang is set for the bottom and entire side. Next bleeder goes down on the bottom and so on. Then a full shingle and put it to the edge flush. Next take 6 inches off the next and fallow that until your back to a full shingle again. When I get past the half shingle I put one nail in the cut piece to make sure it runs straight. This style you run bleeders up the rakes which gives the best ground apperance when done. Having a good bundler tossing every shingle close to were you need it helps speed things up. A good bundler can toss me the last four in the bundle and have another bundle near by before I run out. Having a bundler load up on nails help too so you never have to wait for him if you run out. When I get to the right side of the roof I take 3-4 shingles cut them upside down if I don't resuse the shingles form the left rake and cut them to the shingles nearest to the last to cut. The smaller pieces get run on the short runs while the three or four cut fit perfectly into place. There have been many 30sq+ days on 7 or 8/12 hips roofs with a good bundler. 36sq is my personal best one day running Iko Cambridge laminates papered in hip roof 6/12 by myself. All vents installed and valleys cut no ridging. My fathers best still sits around 48sq after all these years, with a bundler of course but not a tosser, just a bundler to set them on jacks racking method of course.

This method you never have to cut a left run rake and walk again on the shingles. When the pieces are cut a good bundler will set them on the other rake end for later use upside down of course if hot.

I like running out of a valley even if sometimes it's to the left but not for more than 15ft. The only valley method I use is the closed California style. I'll run the first roof with a shingle to the right then the shingle that goes in the valley and on the other piece of roof afterwards making sure it's at least a foot past the point of the valley. When running into or out of a valley on the second roof it's works best when hot ro run a shingle upside down to prevent both tarring on the first roof and cutting into the valley.

Pitch or potato forks for ripping and dump trailers, tarps, and boom trucks for tear offs, and of course a good magnet roller.

Figured to make my body last longer in the trade try to spend more time trying to hone in on good estimating and sales tactics than finding better ways to lay shingles which I do a minumal of 40% of every new roof or tear off.
 

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BTW, nail laminates in the thickest part of the shingle! Because of the nail lines I'll never be able to nail laminates as fast as racked three tabs. But at least I know there better shingles which make less call backs which saves me time.
 

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Not too hard to hit high numbers when you have someone throwing them to you. You guys still crack me up with the racking and lines. hahahahaha
Anyways...........................

Certainteed recommends the racking method when using there "Super Shangle's"

But then again what do they know? LOL!!!

All I know is I'll keep roofing the way I know best.
 

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On the Landmark wrapper Certainteed calls for splitting the third or fourth shingle with a new full shingle. The seventh addition of Certainteeds Master Installer book calls for a stairstep all the way up or whatever is currently written on the package.

I only rack three or four tab shingles.

The Guiness Book of World Records claims the fastest roofer at 65sq's in an 8 hour period. A few years ago a roofer on another roofing forum said he was across the street working on a building when the record was broke in Chicago in the 80's. It was a large building low pitch nothing in the way, stapled with a bundler.

I pay good shingle tossers up to $20 an hour. When the shingles are tossed to you one by one you don't get wore down fingertips and you can stay on your knees laying shingles for hours on end.

A couple years ago I got to a 30sq 6/12 new roof at 8:30am. I loaded the roof and papered in the upper section and lower section by the time my one helper arived at 10:30am. By the time the sun was down the whole house was finished and the job was clean. My helper did not put on one shingle that day. Good money for one day paying only one worker but a lot less money than on tear offs.

I use jacks on three tabs and 16 penny nails for Landmarks. Some pieces of roof when there not hot I'll put nails all over the roof and come within a bundle of finishing without having to move the bundles again. This was when I worked for a few years alone every day, which doesn't happy anymore. The new construction was easy solo but tear offs were not fun! With just one helper I bet in 10 years I did close to 100 tear offs on top of 40-50 new roofs per year.

If any local guys want to visit a job let me know! Perhaps I'll plan to have the cute 19 yo college student work that day!!!
 

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I go through a lot of bundlers. When I first started roofing at the tender age of 13 I bundled for my father who would get on 25 sq's a day minumal for days on end all summer long, most days were 10 hours. By the time I was 16 I laid my first shingle. He then ran 5 new construction crews so he stuck me with one if his crews. When I was 15 durring a Summer month we worked 20 days straight. My fathers longest run was 42 days straight on the roof.

The first year I bundled all Summer I was paid $5 an hour each year increeasing a dollar an hour before I finally started shingling. By the time I was 18 the hourly pay was up to $15 an hour. At 19 my father and I went into business together and at the age of 22 I went solo and have never looked back. Now at 27 wondering if I want to bust my butt on the roof everyday for the next 30 years. 7 years ago I got the chance to train my little brother how to shingle and 3 years later he went on his own and has done pretty well.

To think I used to get paid $5 an hour to work as hard as people I pay to do the same thing making up to $20 an hour! Unreal!!!

I learned the best way to keep bundlers and grunts around it to treat them well. Having a cooler full of water, ice and energy drinks helps along with free food helps them come back the next day. I'll spend hundreds of dollars a week on my guys between food and drink. To keep the cute 19 year old chick comming to work everyday I bought her a car unitl my wife found out!!! Now she only works a couple days a week but it's nice eye candy. She works circles around half the grunts on a daily basis.
 

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One man crew for about 5 years doing around 40-50 roofs a year with a few tear offs in there.

With all the referrals comming in I can no longer keep up by myself. Now all work is either run with the main crew or roofs are subbed out to my brother or brothers or they help me on the job. My father still works most weekends for me as well.

I've got quite a few pictures of my female worker but all are with a disposable cammera and the scanner broke. I've got some pictures of her laying the Winterguard, tearing off, papering, and shingling. Picture the look on the male homeowners faces when they come home to see a 120 lb 5ft 19 year old blonde girl working on the roof! She has no problem carying full bundles of shingles. She is one of the fastest learners yet. Her brother my best friend since elementery shcool is also a pretty smart guy and a fast learner.

With a 50% chance of rain tommorrow thinking a new roof then back to tearing off on Wednesday. The rest of the week looks crappy.

BTW, I'll post pics when I get them on my pc. She does look pretty damn fine though when she's not on the roof!!! Perhaps I'll get a picture of her next time we go out away from work.
 

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My father used to work for the roofing union. Said the two most important decisions in his roofing career to date was first quitting his father in laws huge factory job and then quitting the union.

He's been self employed as a roofing contractor for the past 25 years. His getting close to 50 and it's not about the money for him anymore, it's about retirement and making enough to live happy not rich. When he see's me go go go he remembers what it was like when he was my age. 20 years straight Monday-Saturday sun up till sun down (unless it was raining, snowing, hunting season or ice fishing!).
 

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I agree with Kirk.

My best laborers are the ones that have what I need before I ask for them. Usually the're not laborers for long as they start laying shingles before most. My 17 year old cousin is the first person in this catagory that comes to mind.

Some laborers must think I'm crazy as things are said so fast and often. After doing it so long you don't have to really think anymore.
 

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what are Landmarks?
It's the Certainteed's laminte shingle.

I use mostly Lomanco's painted galvanized air vents. They are flat sided so when using with laminate shingles make installation easy even when cold. Plus with the metal you can use the nail gun to install. Aluminum vents work good to but show more hail then metal.

Been putting on more and more ridge vent lately but still aren't convinced with it. Over the past few years have learned that as little plastic on the roof the better, most ridge vent is plastic. Try to install ridge vent in the middle of Winter with a nail gun.

Since last Fall I've switched my felt over entirely to Certainteeds Roofers Sellect 15#. It cost almost double what I can buy felt for in the big box store but I like running Certainteed Winterguard and Roofers Sellect. Lays flat, needs less tacks, rarely blows off, and doesn't get wavy when wet.
 

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aluminum is a metal, fwiw.
That's funny, Lomanco shows a painted aluminum vent and a painted galvanized vent with two different model numbers.

If you pick up an aluminum vent then a galvanized vent of the same size and brand the galvanized vent will weigh more. If the weight is to close to determine a magnet will tell you which is which, fwiw.

The simple point I was trying to make was although both may let out air at the same rate the ALUMINUM vent will show more hail damage than the GALVANIZED vent.
 

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Aaron,

As a business "sole proprietor", there is a way around the not working on the jobs supposed rule. I did it, and worked with my alter ego union company for several years until I got tired of the travel hassles with the kind of new construction I was into. PM me if you want more information.

Then there is this side of the coin to consider also;

If you operate a corporation, then you are not the "owner", but just an employee.

Ed
Wouldn't you be the "President" if you own a corporation?
 
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