Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Goin' Down in Flames....
Highwayman
Joined
·
6,274 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I e-mailed MK Diamonds "customer service" a week ago and still haven't heard back from them. :rolleyes: Morons.


So, which saw do you use profile blades on? I have an old MK 470, and it doesn't take them. Besides, I've never seen a 7" bullnose blade.

I'm wanting to step up to a 10" pro model MK Diamond, just want to make sure I can run the blades on them.

Oh, and the guy at the best tool shop in the county gave me one of those, "Uh, dude, I have no idea. Maybe you should call the manufacturer". :wallbash: What the phuk is wrong with people these days? :blink:



As an aside, what the hell are 6" bullnose blades for, anyway? I've never seen a 6" tile saw. :blink





Delta
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,523 Posts
Email is worst way to contact manufacturers. Even the better companies have lag time in returning email (but to be fair, it's late the same day or midafternoon the next.)

Call the tech department.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,751 Posts
I believe I have a 7" bullnose blade , 6 is fine also if you have a plunge type saw which they all usually adjust. I don't even know where to look to find my blade, I think I got it on e bay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,076 Posts
....
As an aside, what the hell are 6" bullnose blades for, anyway? I've never seen a 6" tile saw. :blink
....
Delta
If your saw isn't easily adjustable, you could put a spacer and shims under your tile, to use a smaller bullnose blade on a larger machine. That's my plan, anyway, as I'm about to start cutting some bullnose on my 10" saw, and I don't even want to know what a 10" bullnose blade costs.
 

·
Goin' Down in Flames....
Highwayman
Joined
·
6,274 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think they start at about $300, and go up from there. :eek:

Mine doesn't have a plunge head. Wish it did.

As far as shimming, the blade tends to push the tile sideways, so when you stack something underneath to get the height right, it pushes the tile over, and gives a very uneven cut. Because you are removing the layer of glazing, any deviation from dead-nuts straight, shows up badly.

Just my experience.





Delta
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,076 Posts
I think they start at about $300, and go up from there. :eek:

Mine doesn't have a plunge head. Wish it did.

As far as shimming, the blade tends to push the tile sideways, so when you stack something underneath to get the height right, it pushes the tile over, and gives a very uneven cut. Because you are removing the layer of glazing, any deviation from dead-nuts straight, shows up badly.

Just my experience.

Delta
I appreciate the comments. I'm going to machine some slots in the braces for mine so that I can lower the head and use a 6" or 8" blade.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,523 Posts
How do you plan to shim up the material?
I've used Corian (preferred) or plywood in 3/4" +/- to make a base then glued or screwed another piece onto the base piece as a guide like a table saw. The important thing is to attach the new base piece so it can not move. Attachment depends on your saw's original metal base. You might have to drill through the Corian and existing base then bolt together if clamping won't work.
I've used this system recently to rip marble threshold into 1 1/2" x 36" pieces to make ledge.

ForumRunner_20140516_053541.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,520 Posts
Why not just rent a 7" tile saw for a day. I keep a 7" tile saw around just for that purpose. Right now it has a blade on it for glass tile. I can have them both on the same job for different purposes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,857 Posts
Be aware that most of the profile blades that can be mounted on wet saws are made only for soft stone, some may be used in granite, but none of them will last at all on porcelain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,751 Posts
I use to use a 4" grinder and polishing pads for bullnose, that crap gets old, I'll do it for porcelain and stone but ceramic I'll use a schluter trim.
The wet saw profile wheel I'll gradually cut, lowering the blade at each pass, can't remember how the water hits the wheel sufficiently or not, labor rate dropped so we don't do much tile, only when there's significant floor prep which no one local can compete with us.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top