Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A neighbour wants me to replace threshold and possibly entire double doorway, if needed.

Threshold is at least 20 years old and rotten in places; vertical wood that meets it is good, as of three inches above the threshold. I'm thinking of cutting about a foot up in the vertical part, reconstructing and joining to the existing wood, since the entire top of the door frame is in good shape.

Or is this likely a whole new entranceway job?

Don't really want to start this without a sense of how threshold is mounted to building (it's a Victorian, ca. 1889) and would appreciate any advice on best wood to mill this threshold (2/12) out of. Or are engineered thresholds vastly longer lasting?

Any advice/opinions / technical pointers muchly appreciated; he's on a budget and I'd love to keep the time down on this job, but don't want it falling apart or loosening under foot, in a year or two!

Stephen
 

Attachments

·
Lack Of All Trades
Joined
·
1,232 Posts
If on a budget then cut out damaged sections then replace with new wood-paint and stain.

Prefab doors--the threshold is usually attached to the vertical path. Attach the new cut-in to whatever existing wood is available to attach to. The threshold gets caulked with liquid nails or such. Good luck.
 

·
Curmudgeon
Joined
·
11,706 Posts
Most of those sills were
white oak.
Still a good choice, and
very durable.
If you're careful, dutchmen
for the jambs is a good way
to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys; now concrete or oak or wood w/ aluminum?

Thanks so much for the help, guys. Has anyone an opinion on the relative merits of redoing it in oak, doing cheaper wood (cedar) or pouring a box of concrete?

I'm presuming that making a concrete box 4 inches thick or so (except where it overlays the foundation bricks visible in pic 2, there about 2 inches for appropriate height) with rebars going along front to back perpendicular to house (not sideways or parallel to it), would be the ticket with the concrete?

Guy's neighbour has concrete already. Is there a particularly strong or weatherproof concrete to use here in climates like Toronto? Salt may have to be used from time to time.

If we go with wood, and paint it with supergood exterior latex, would it just rot again? This is an east facing entrance and gets its share of snow and ice (and rain etc).

The ultimate would be a cupola or some sort of entrance cover but that's another story...

Thanks again for any and all opinions.

Cheers from Canada.

Stephen
 

Attachments

·
Lack Of All Trades
Joined
·
1,232 Posts
Things like this is why I could never be a handyman. If I couldn't tear the whole mess out and replace all the rotted wood, which probably goes down to the foundation and into the joists, I'd walk away. There's no way something like that could be patched and done right IMO.
I didn't see the updated photos since I posted. It's pretty obvious that the complete door + all rotted wood, etc., needs to be completely replaced. I gave my opinion with the pictures that were available this morning which showed just the door and threshold intact. Upon further inspection-on site-that would have been my recommendation also.

I completely agree with your point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Hey thanks for the input! It's not rotten underneath though...

Thanks again for your thoughts...the board up front was the rotting threshold; should have removed it so you could see better.

The wood it's meeting is dry and in decent shape. Had another contractor friend by and he concurred; it's good the guy caught this in time before the threshold rotted away letting water into house.

What I was hoping for was a sense of what's better generally for an entranceway; concrete boxed or going back with the original oak, and a proper water-return threshold?
 

·
Curmudgeon
Joined
·
11,706 Posts
Thanks again for your thoughts...the board up front was the rotting threshold; should have removed it so you could see better.

The wood it's meeting is dry and in decent shape. Had another contractor friend by and he concurred; it's good the guy caught this in time before the threshold rotted away letting water into house.

What I was hoping for was a sense of what's better generally for an entranceway; concrete boxed or going back with the original oak, and a proper water-return threshold?
Either way it needs a proper pan.
Old houses I like to stay
as close to original as money
and sanity permit.
 

·
I like Green things
Joined
·
23,001 Posts
I actually think that it does not look too bad. Is that old siding in behind there? That framing in the right side is just old cripples right?

I would put it back together with White oak as well. I am sure you can find a sawyer that has large timber to thickness plane and match what you have there. Buying direct from the Sawyer is really pretty inexpensive. All the money is in the milling and finishing of the rough stock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
600 Posts
They can't afford a new door, but are talking about a portico? Personally, I would rip that mess out, and put in a new door.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
I know there are people who could patch this up and make it look nice. But I see a lot of rotted wood in those pictures. Fixing the door without fixing everything to me is just a cover up and will cause more problems down the road.
I might be able to save the door, but everything else would have to be replaced if I did the job
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top