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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I do exclusively finish carpentry on new homes, and work with my 22 yr old son. When I was 14 I cut off part of 3 fingers on my right hand on a log splitter. Two of them more than halfway.

I have been trimming houses for 20 years, and have been very fortunate with no major accidents with saws. That being said, now that I have my son working with me and I'm short on fingers myself :). I'm thinking about getting one of the smaller Sawstop brand table saws with the job site cart/stand.

Has anyone else been using this saw for job site use and can you give me any advice weather it's too heavy for moving from job to job and the quality of the saw. I work out of a trailer with a ramp.
We have been using the portable Bosch saw.
Thanks.
 

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Hair Splitter
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250+lbs for a contractor saw? No thanks. But I understand wanting to protect your loved ones from suffering the same fate as you have. Accidents happen, but are preventable. This is just one more step in preventing them. I just don't like the idea of getting comfortable around a table saw.
 

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Saw stop makes a smaller job site saw. It is still, but it does not weigh 250 lbs.
Size wise it would be comparable to the Bosche.
 

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Hair Splitter
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Saw stop makes a smaller job site saw. It is still, but it does not weigh 250 lbs.
Size wise it would be comparable to the Bosche.
The Bosch weighs 133lbs (shipping weight).

The only contractor saw on their site weighs 225lbs without the 30" fence or the mobile cart which is 50lbs.

What model are you looking at?

http://www.sawstop.com/support/product-comparison
 

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Always Learning
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No offense meant Don, but what was the cause of your finger loss? Accidents do happen, but awareness, proper training, and respect for the tool will go a lot further than a product put on the market to make us "feel" safe. I am not a fan of the saw stop and the political bullying they are trying to use to force us to use their products. My dad taught me to use a table saw properly over 25 years ago and that is a tool I still respect every time I use it. JMPOV.
 

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I know it will not replace the table saw 100% but a track saw will do almost anything a table saw will and a lot safer. To be honest I don't even like to turn the table saw on anymore. I am trying to work around it if I could.Except for some very thin moulding that has to be ripped to match existing work I do not use the table saw for anything else.And trying to eliminate that by sharpening my hand planes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
overanalyze said:
No offense meant Don, but what was the cause of your finger loss? Accidents do happen, but awareness, proper training, and respect for the tool will go a lot further than a product put on the market to make us "feel" safe. I am not a fan of the saw stop and the political bullying they are trying to use to force us to use their products. My dad taught me to use a table saw properly over 25 years ago and that is a tool I still respect every time I use it. JMPOV.
It was a log splitter 34 yrs ago when I was 14. I still have respect for a table saw every time I use it. I love to play guitar and mandolin and would be depressed if something worse would happen to my fingers.
Just trying to minimize the chances of an accident.
 

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Paul
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A riving knife, push sticks, feather boards, training, and a healthy respect for the tool will eliminate nearly every accident risk with a table saw outside of an electrical shock. I have been bitten twice by one. First time I got three fingers at once, second time was only a slight scratch on one. Both times were due to being too comfortable with the saw and not using a push stick. As mentioned above, I don't like the idea of anything that makes you feel comfortable around a saw.
 

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Saw stop makes a smaller job site saw. It is still, but it does not weigh 250 lbs.
Size wise it would be comparable to the Bosche.
I am interested in this "smaller job site saw".

Referencing SawStop's site (www.sawstop.com), the smallest shown is their contractor saw.

Shipping weight (no extras) is 240 pounds, which probably has the saw coming in around 220.

Would you post a link to their smaller saw (comparable to the Bosch)?

Thanks in a advance and, perhaps, someone should notify Saw Stop and inform them that product is not on their website.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Lanya LaPunta said:
I am interested in this "smaller job site saw". Referencing SawStop's site (www.sawstop.com), the smallest shown is their contractor saw. Shipping weight (no extras) is 240 pounds, which probably has the saw coming in around 220. Would you post a link to their smaller saw (comparable to the Bosch)? Thanks in a advance and, perhaps, someone should notify Saw Stop and inform them that product is not on their website.[/
Amazon has it listed at 100 lbs but don't think that's correct All other sites show it weighing over 200lbs
 

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Focusing on solutions.
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A riving knife, push sticks, feather boards, training, and a healthy respect for the tool will eliminate nearly every accident risk with a table saw outside of an electrical shock. I have been bitten twice by one. First time I got three fingers at once, second time was only a slight scratch on one. Both times were due to being too comfortable with the saw and not using a push stick. As mentioned above, I don't like the idea of anything that makes you feel comfortable around a saw.

Jenny was scared to death of running a tablesaw when she first started helping me full time. Scared to the point that she was going to get herself hurt because she was paralyzed by fear.

One day, I took the time to walk her through every scenario I could think of that would get her in trouble with the saw. I intentionally setup kickback situations & allowed it to happen & showed her how to control it when it did happen. I showed her where the safe zones were around the saw & where the hot zones were. I showed her how to always have one hand firmly planted on the saw so she could shift her weight & get out of the way when things went bad.

Today, she's not scared to tackle any task she's presented with on the tablesaw, even though she still has the utmost respect for it & a healthy dose of fear. She's no longer paralyzed by that fear.

Like overanalyze stated, I really don't like the politics of the inventor of sawstop, so I'm no inclined to help him financially force his invention on the rest of us.

Lets say I did buy one though, how would I combat the dangers of other dangerous tools in my shop? Like the shaper, or router table or even the jointer for that matter? My 17" bandsaw with a 1" blade scares me far more than my tablesaw.

Common sense, a healthy fear & a good understanding of what can go wrong & following general safety rules will prevent the lions share of accidents from happening in the first place.
 

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Another thing comes to mind. I was watching Jenny on the miter saw one day & she was reaching across the blade path to hold the stock & using her other hand to start the saw. Again, I had to show her why what she was doing wrong could get her hurt & show her the right way to do it. IMO, if you'd take the time to show your son the ins & outs & the right & wrong ways of running the tools, you'll do him a far greater service than buying him a sawstop. Teaching safety & proper procedures will transfer to all the tools that could get him hurt that don't have the sensors.
 

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Sorry quote didn't work.

Amazon has it listed at 100 lbs but don't think that's correct All other sites show it weighing over 200lbs
Are you looking at the stand or saw? Can you post a link?
 
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