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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1) is it used instead of sheathing?
2) is tyvek out on top of it?
3) is insulation board put on top of THERMOPLAY(DUMB QUESTION)?
4) HOW MUCH IS IT PER SQ?
thanks guys
 

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Al Smith
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thermo ply!!, how could I forget? I encountered it in the fall of 83 while doing work for US home. This is a foil faced thin cardboard sheathing which must be fully blocked and nailed on 3" centers on all edges and 6" centers in the field with roofers. Which NO ONE actually did on that condo job site. When they dried in the units across from where i was working including the single hung aluminum windows they cut the sheathing with a knife and folded it back to load the rock. On a sunny day you had to wear sunglasses on the job site or risk burning your damn retinas out. I am glad to say I never encountered that **** again in 27 years. The only "plus" for this alleged "material" was the ability to use it behind kitchen soffits during block out as it qualified as a fire block.
 

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The Duke
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I used it once. 49-1/2" wide and attached just like A W stated, with roofing nails. You could carry at least 20 sheets at a time. Inside corners of outside walls, you had to double studs up since there was no nailing left after putting in a 2x2 inside corner board.

Cheap from my understanding. Kind of let's the burglars in real easy with vinyl siding.
 

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This brings back some memories . Back in the 90's most production houses built in my area were sheathed with Thermo Ply .

We had to put metal bracing on an angle at each end of the walls before we put the Thermo ply down . We used a wide crown stapler to attach it to the studs back then .

Another fun one was Celotex . It was some kind of fiber board crap . Had to use plywood on the corners of those walls though .

Worst thing about Celotex was on Monday mornings we would spend half a day putting in blocking where kids came in and kicked holes in between the studs .

Fun stuff . I actually would,nt have a problem with either product if if was going have bricks over it . If it is siding I would say no way for me .

Back then there was no tyvek around here and Thermo Ply repelled water very well on the outer side . Made great sleds as well .
FYI I never saw any other insulation or vapor barrier installed over the exterior of Thermo Ply or Celotex .

I'd have to ask why you would want to use this product now ? In my area plywood and OSB are pretty low at this time .
 

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solar guy
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Lots of stuff around DC was built with Thermoply sheathing. I am surprised about the metal angle brace though it was supposed to be structural sheathing unless he is referring to thermax sheathing which is a 1/2" foam.
I still use thermoply for floor protection. The stuff is great for that.
 

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Al Smith
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Lots of stuff around DC was built with Thermoply sheathing. I am surprised about the metal angle brace though it was supposed to be structural sheathing unless he is referring to thermax sheathing which is a 1/2" foam.
I still use thermoply for floor protection. The stuff is great for that.
Ryland Homes from Va/Maryland area used Thermo Ply. They were featured in an old "This Old House" episode about manufactured homes. With Bob Villa demonstrating the "strength" of the sheathing by jumping up and down on a section of sheathed wall on the factory floor.
 

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Al Smith
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So did Centex, Pulte, Ryan (Ryland's brother) and many others.
that stuff is tough but you can cut it with a knife as long as it is sharp.
Nicest part was overlaping the seams very little cutting to install.
Or if you're an intoxicated sub contractor at a Christmas "party" taking place in a semi finished condo in Plainsboro NJ you can demonstrate how strong you are by charging through a wall from inside to outside and blow right through the vinyl siding. Then get thrown off the site and fired the next morning. I wish I coulda met that guy. Sounds like he would have been a blast to work with.
 

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When I used to work for Centex Homes in Winston Salem four years ago as a field manager (since shut the division down), we would place our mechanical units into second floor closets rather than the attic space as some of the local competing production builders did. In thier corporate studies, Centex found that by using the thermo ply to cover the walls and ceilings of the small closet it helped the performace of the HVAC system. This thermoply had no foil radiant barrier though. It was all white... it did more to confuse me.

I had a hard time believing it, as it would be tough to quantify it, but they did everything with a purpose and I am sure if it didnt serve the purpose they wouldnt waste the money. Even though I always thought it was...:rolleyes:
 

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is "Celotex " that cardboard type stuff you see under shingles on homes built in the 1940's ?
1/2", black, crumbly stuff usualy accompanied by plywood corners
 

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Lots of stuff around DC was built with Thermoply sheathing. I am surprised about the metal angle brace though it was supposed to be structural sheathing unless he is referring to thermax sheathing which is a 1/2" foam.
I still use thermoply for floor protection. The stuff is great for that.

This is going back a few years for me but I remember putting the metal bracing in . Then again I remember using red and blue thermo ply maybe we didn't brace all of it . I think the red was weaker .

I do know we always used a wide crown stapler to put it down . Same stapler we were putting shingles down with back then LOL.

I worked for the biggest framing / roofing contractor in my area and almost all the helpers were convicts from the pre release facility . A couple were lead guys and very talented .

I occasionally ride by some of those neighborhoods and they are still standing .
 

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So did Centex, Pulte, Ryan (Ryland's brother) and many others.
.

THats a nice list of production builders . Around here Washington Homes was the big dog . Same type setup as the ones you mention .

Funniest saying back in the day was "If you buy from Ryan you'll be Cryin."

Pulte was considered above those others back then in my area .

Ryan is still around here but know the bigger builders are region specific . No more Thermo Ply either .
 

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Thom
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was the stuff back in the 1940's(Celotex) a brown color?
Cellotex is a brand name for asphalt impregnated fiberboard sheathing. The faces are black (asphalt) and the interior is brown. It is quite soft. It is non-structural. Used as sheathing, every 5th sheet and all corners had to be plywood to provide minimum racking resistance.

I think one of the biggest headaches with fiberboard sheathing is that it tends to warp and bow, especially if it gets wet. The exterior walls end up being wavy.

There is a different but similar product used on roofs. Generally it is a light gray or white (not asphalt impregnated), and is higher density than the fiberboard sheathing. The stuff used on roofs is used for insulation, building crickets, and cant strips.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
i think what i was referring to was called "beaver board" back in the 1920's..it may be a bit different than celotx. beaver board was used as sheathing under old cedar shakes back in the day.
 
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