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Hack
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I've never been the one to be in charge of layout on the commercial jobs, but I've assisted in most of them.
We had a set point of reference that would be referred to for the entire project. Typically it was a grid line or intersecting gridlines from the plan that we could utilize throughout the entire build.
 

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Registered
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66 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Yup, gridlines. Sometimes you can see them on the underside of the slab where the original chalklines were snapped. Center of columns is another common place to snap a line to get a parallel/square line. You can never trust someone elses layout though so we usually have to go back to the plans and find out where the gridline is and re-establish it. We just had to tear apart a nice curved fountain form because the elevation line that someone else marked all around the parkade was 3" too high.
 

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Forming and Framing
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6,273 Posts
Yup, gridlines. Sometimes you can see them on the underside of the slab where the original chalklines were snapped. Center of columns is another common place to snap a line to get a parallel/square line. You can never trust someone elses layout though so we usually have to go back to the plans and find out where the gridline is and re-establish it. We just had to tear apart a nice curved fountain form because the elevation line that someone else marked all around the parkade was 3" too high.
How would you mark top of pour on a curved form.. i take it just swing the transit every 12" and set nails?
 

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Project Superintendent
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2,525 Posts
We do a lot of MEVA light panels here. They are all crane set. I have used doka peri and we still use symons for small stuff. I understand this is not a commercial forum but I'm just saying where my experience lies
Maybe the OP should ask a mod to have it reposted in the commercial section.
 

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Project Superintendent
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2,525 Posts
I've never been the one to be in charge of layout on the commercial jobs, but I've assisted in most of them.
We had a set point of reference that would be referred to for the entire project. Typically it was a grid line or intersecting gridlines from the plan that we could utilize throughout the entire build.
Typically we will set control offsets for an x/y axis for a basic rectangular building. We set up tack and hubs far enough away from the building that they can stay there until the structure is up, and everyone uses the same reference points for layout. We usually pour some concrete around them to make sure they don't go anywhere. Elevation bench marks are usually established during the site survey in the design process. In urban areas a common bench mark would be the top of a bolt on a fire hydrant. Column lines make things real easy. All the column lines have a number in one axis and a letter in the other and an elevation at each floor level.
 

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Have Trowel, Do travel
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909 Posts
pictures please, because I do a lot of forming, and i don't understand a word you's saying.

I'll start
concrete formed stairs SCALA.jpg
 
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Project Superintendent
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2,525 Posts
How do you snap a round line? :whistling
It all depends on how tight your radius is. If its a large radius then you can span accross it every 3 feet or so and you are still only a couple inches away in the center between the points- pull straight back and pop the line. But if you have a grade nail every 3 or 4 feet you should be good anyway, just eyeball and let gravity and the vibrator level in between.
 

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Have Trowel, Do travel
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909 Posts
And before laser, dumpy before that water level
its been a while since the last time we used a water level.
for out dated technology its still wayyyy more accurate than the laser
 
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