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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
I am pretty sure it's not fire clay, the mortar I have seen them use is sand mix. But with that said I am unaware of what fire clay is. Goggle may give me that answer.

I also am unaware of what raked means to a mason, and I am sure goggle doesn't have that answer.



This will help you understand the nuances of laying fire brick. Please not the extremely tight joints,one could barely place a playing card between them.The tight joints and 'special" mortar lends itself to many years of service life.

Also,a raked joint is when the mortar is recessed beyond the face of the brick. Unless my eyes deceive me,that is what the masons did on the subject firebox. Not really the preferred method by most trade standards.
Thanks for the info. These guys made a slurry mortar after the slab was assembled on the floor. They did flush out the mortar with the face of the bricks, with the watered down mortar

I guess there was shrinking of the mortar? That sounds logical to me.

I would like to hear from you, just love learning.
 

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The most efficient way of doing it the way they did it is to grout bag the joints, unfortunately you can’t get a code compliant mortar using that method.

Looks good, A plus for execution, but I’d rather have a lip here or there with a 2000 degree rated mortar.

Things to be aware of before you start doing the bowing thing to the masons...
 

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Not only that but if you don’t have ties in your piers you have a pile of sheot. Hopefully they thought that part through somehow, but it doesn’t look like it.
 

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The most efficient way of doing it the way they did it is to grout bag the joints, unfortunately you can’t get a code compliant mortar using that method.

Looks good, A plus for execution, but I’d rather have a lip here or there with a 2000 degree rated mortar.

Things to be aware of before you start doing the bowing thing to the masons...


:thumbsup:


Yes,besides not having 2,000 degree mortar,in order for mortar to properly bond with masonry units,it needs to be in compression,as in full shoved joints.That is why in re pointing,it needs to be placed in lifts and compressed with slicker / backfiller and tooled
 

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If you guys would join the Facebook group there is a very good mason who builds his back wall plumb, I think with cardboard under where it transitions to a slant, anyways , it’s built plumb the next day he leans it back, puts heat stop under it and in the slants and leans it in. Comes out perfect. 30 years of masonry no doubt helps!

I have a couple of 4’ orton boxes coming up and may try his method.
 
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