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I dont know who that is but it looks like a cool project. Is it going to take 1000 years to build it or is it supposed to last that long?
 

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Compared to some Russian homes I have seen being built, it looks a little flimsy.

A lot of differences in the traditional details and prefernces, but the bone are the same.

In Russia, a common wall is 0.5 meter (20" thick made up of an 8" masonry exterior wall, 4" of foam insulation and an 8" interior masonry wall) that is usually plastered on the interior. The basement is built out of solid 20" thick concrete blocks with a 20"x 40" or 80" face. No wood in the structure, but 10" concrete plank for floors with wood flooring over the concrete.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Not a Twitter guy. Is there another link?



Yes there is. This project is in essence a continuation of his first project we examined on CT. called hopeforarchitecture. I talk with Clay about once a month or so,after mentioning there were not many posting with current project,he told me click on the connection to twitter on hope site.


Not too good explaining computer stuff,but here goes. Type in www.hopeforarchitecture.com go to bottom of page,at bottom click on blog on left,or twitter far right. The far right will show a ton more pictures than blog click. Hope this helps out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I dont know who that is but it looks like a cool project. Is it going to take 1000 years to build it or is it supposed to last that long?



Ha! Ha! I will pass that on,Clay has a good sense of humor and he will appreciate it. Tgeb was correct,we kind of tracked his first project on CT.back in 2012 & 13.

Talked with Clay Tue. or Wed. he is making headway,he got 35K brick laid last week with 6 masons in 5 days. The brick he is using are one of my favorites. They are a solid molded with frog from Old Va. brick from Salem Va.

Hope our friend Brickhook tunes in,the brick were made in his backyard. I think I will PM him and give him a heads up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A little side note,I got a kick out of the other home that appears in the background in some of his photos that is getting built at the same time,reminds me of the three little pigs story.:laughing:
 

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There is a picture of a note one of the kids wrote about the honey bees vanishing. It is a major problem and it is caused by the pesticides that the gmo crows actually grow in their cells or some crap like that. If the honey bees die off pretty much all living things on earth die with them.

Thats all.

Of and how are people getting solid bricks for .30? Were paying about .80.
 

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Fred, thanks for sharing this for us, it's an awesome project. Them guys are putting 'em in the wall!

I love Old Virginia brick, we lay a lot of them. And they look great. We use them mainly on colonial style and farm style houses.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
There is a picture of a note one of the kids wrote about the honey bees vanishing. It is a major problem and it is caused by the pesticides that the gmo crows actually grow in their cells or some crap like that. If the honey bees die off pretty much all living things on earth die with the

.


You are correct about the bees dying being big trouble. Last year in the paper I read they think genetically modified crops (whatever that means) could possibly be part of the trouble for the bees. Wonder if eating that stuff is good for us ??:blink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Of and how are people getting solid bricks for .30? Were paying about .80.



If you buy a million,the price goes down.:laughing: No,seriously many of those bricks are totally structurally sound seconds.
 

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Just looked at a bunch of the pics on twitter...awesome!!

i may have to sign up for twitter just so I can follow.
 

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If I could buy those bricks for 30c a piece I'd never want to install anything else.

35k brick in 5 days with 6 installers, damn they're moving. It looks like there isn't much jointing going on in some areas though so it's kind of like me installing 300 brick in a day

edit..yes I'm being facetious
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
If I could buy those bricks for 30c a piece I'd never want to install anything else.

35k brick in 5 days with 6 installers, damn they're moving.


On a side note,without discrediting them,on mass walls the count goes up. The center wythe fill in is part of the reason.As our friend from the U.K. (Stuart45) said once,over there they call it Larrying in.


I could state the numbers we got production wise in the '70's on some outrageously wide mass walls but everyone would call it a fish tale.:laughing:
 

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Oh I know that on a triple wythe wall the centre flies in, then often gets cut @ the tie courses cause it's too high. Often the inner wall goes really quick too if it's going to get plastered, still 7000 bricks a day between 6 installers is pretty good, maybe even more so for the guys mixing, that's over 50 batches a day!

C'mon throw some numbers out, I wanna hear. Cavity walls or multi wythe brick walls?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
C'mon throw some numbers out, I wanna hear. Cavity walls or multi wythe brick walls?


Here is the story. Winter of '78-'79 working in Chicago,brutal winter lots of snow. A hide processor at 42nd and Marshfield owns a 5 story building with walls abutting their single story building. They were only using the first story of the five story building,paying high property taxes for more building then they were using. Single story building had 125' clear span bowstring trusses. Huge snow collapses trusses,reason being,trusses were rotted where they entered pockets in brick walls.


While we brought in crane to lift debris over single story walls,light bulb comes on in owners head. Wreck top four floors of five story,thereby reducing tax bill significantly. Used a clam shell bucket on crane to "bite" off tops of walls once brought down close to top of first floor level,walls needed obviously to be leveled out. Cranes are not too neat.:laughing:


Bottom line,those two abutting walls were very close to six feet in width ! Three feet each building. We set scaffolding on both sides of wall,ran up the two outer wythes to header high. The scaffolding was a section above the masons work platform. Tenders shoveled mud into inner wythes. Masons kept their trowels on mud boards,placed brick on open arm , one in hand,rest on arm from wrist to elbow and "shoved" them "home" in the wet mud.


That production hit over 2,500 brick a day per mason.It did take a heck of a wide custom made metal coping to cover the top of that wall.:laughing:
 

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Interesting house fjn. I've built quite a few walls that thick, but never used that type of bond. Normally headers and stretchers every course or Flemish. Seen a bond known as Clip bond on a really old property.
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Interesting house fjn. I've built quite a few walls that thick, but never used that type of bond. Normally headers and stretchers every course or Flemish. Seen a bond known as Clip bond on a really old property.
View attachment 109120



Hello Stuart, That bond is referred to as American bond,very prevalent in my neck of the woods also.The headers and stretchers every course is definitely of U.K. origin. With the direct U.K. influence as the country was settled English bond as it is called here was used in Williamsburg Va. up to the water table,then it was a switch to Flemish bond.
 
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