Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

Does this topic or question interest in you?

  • Yes, very much

    Votes: 5 83.3%
  • Somewhat

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • A little

    Votes: 1 16.7%
  • Not at all

    Votes: 0 0.0%
1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Everyone,

I have been snooping around behind the scenes for a bit now.

I am new, started in September 2013, in the carpentry trade. I have been a DIYer for quite some time, but made the transition to full time Carpenter in September.

I am looking for books, text and or reference books, that some of you use or have read. I want to give it a year in my new career, before pursuing some formal school, but also want to get as much knowledge as I can to combine with my OJT. Any info is greatly appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,346 Posts
also framing can be done many different ways depending who you're working for and a book you pick up might teach you a different way than your boss wants things done.
 

·
Hack
Joined
·
3,011 Posts
First thing, get a code book that applies to your locale.
I have a few pdf. books you may be interested in.
PM for a list.
 

·
topsail's trimcat
Joined
·
5,026 Posts
anything in the "for pros by pros" line of books from taunton who publish fine homebuilding magazine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,910 Posts
Gary Katz . And check amazon for used books. I just bunch of old fine homebulding mags for a penny a piece. Lots of good books for les then a dollar
 

·
Goin' Down in Flames....
Highwayman
Joined
·
6,502 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,910 Posts
Californiadecks said:
Fine homebuilding used to be a good magazine until they sold out to the green movement. I'm tired of reading about insulation.
Your right there. I can tell that in the 80's it was all about becoming a better trades man. The mags were larger then today's and a large variety of stories from plumbing, dry setting stone walls to soldering cooper gutters. Now it's short stories with limited info. It's like they need to keep the lawyers happy by not exposing HO to try dangerous ideas.
 

·
Champion Thread Derailer
Joined
·
1,228 Posts
In all honesty, there are far too many excellent references to list here on carpentry, and the building trades in general. I like the Larry Haun book mentioned above The Very Efficient Carpenter: Basic Framing for Residential Construction.

Also check out:

Roof Cutters Secrets by Will Holladay

A Roof Cutter's Secrets to Framing the Custom Home by Will Holladay

Carpentry & Building Construction by Glencoe McGraw-Hill

JLC Field Guide to Residential Construction, Volume 1, and Volume 2

Graphic Guide to Frame Construction by Rob Thallon

Graphic Guide to Interior Details by Rob Thallon

Finish Carpentry: Efficient Techniques for Custom Interiors by Gary Katz

For some tips on faster production in framing: Rough Framing Carpentry by Mark Currie

And as I said, too many other good ones to list here.

I forgot to add that I posed this same inquiry a few years ago here, which you also might want to peruse: http://www.contractortalk.com/f11/opinions-rating-best-books-periodicals-our-industry-82636/
 

·
Good with wood
Joined
·
57 Posts
All of the books already mentioned are great to read and you may learn quite a bit. Some of us may be visual, auditory, etc learners. As for myself, I found that when I first started framing when I was a young teen with my grandfather, I always learned better by doing something. The great thing about working with wood is that its wood! Most mistakes can be fixed. Everything will be a learning experience. Listen to the ones that have been around the block and know what they are doing. I learned much of what I know from my grandfather (master carpenter). If someone tells you to do something that you are unsure of, say something ahead of time and ask them to show you before you dive into it hammer first. You will never know everything. There will always be more to learn. Read those books and when you see something on the job it may make more sense to you than it would have otherwise. Learn as much as you can from as many ways you can. I hope you find that you love carpentry like I do. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
352 Posts
All Good advice.

One thing I'll tell you that I wish I knew when I started out thirty years ago. Go out tomorrow and buy a stiletto hammer. I got mine five years ago and what a difference it made.

Before that my elbow was shot. Even a little work with the estwing hurt. Now it's something I don't even think about anymore.

Also, get some properly fitting and SUPPORTING shoes.

And wear ear protection.

Good luck.

Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
544 Posts
The book Carpentry that was already mentioned is excellent. It will walk you through layout, framing, form work, cabinets, trim, roofs, etc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for all the great advice. I will be heading to the library later to look up a few of these.

What about trade magazines. I have looked at Fine Homebuilding & JLC, are there others I should be looking into? Maybe I should start a new thread for Trade Mags... Thoughts?
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top