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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have to remove a brick column and rebuild. I want to support the porch roof (just a roof no live load) with 2x material attached to a stake maybe 6' back from the porch. the porch roof is about 10' above grade so the bracing would be greater than 45*, closer to 60*. Just wondering how deep the stake would need to be to not move (clay and loam type soil, not sandy). I'm thinking 2'-3' should be enough. Also what size braces I'd need. I'm thinking 2- 2x10-16's but wondering if 2x12's are warranted
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Oh, the other thing i could do, since the column is on the corner is to put a beam across the corner and use a shoring jack on either side. Any benefit to this? The drawback that I can think of is that I would probably have to have the jacks a bit closer to the column. But maybe not
 

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Kowboy
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Oh, the other thing i could do, since the column is on the corner is to put a beam across the corner and use a shoring jack on either side. Any benefit to this? The drawback that I can think of is that I would probably have to have the jacks a bit closer to the column. But maybe not
I've done this, it works, and is my favorite way.
 

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This was how I did one a few years ago when I had to rebuild a porch deck. The braces were 2x4's screwed together "T" style, and screwed to the scrap boards staked flat on the ground so they wouldn't slide.
 

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Well I guess 2x6 would have been more conservative, but it worked the way I did it. But I did deliberately set them as close to vertical as I could and still have room to work, figuring it would be stronger that way, and to transfer the load more straight down than out at an angle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Remember that the T shape 2x4 is not the same as a 2x5 (using his math). The two boards, perpendicular to each other, counteract the flexing/bowing. Think I beam.
really? The two 2x's are oriented in the same strand direction. The roof can only fail in 1 direction so as i see it there's only 1 direction that you need to put the strength (to a point obviously).

But if you guys thing that 2-2x8's would be enough, I'd do that. I want to have enough material that I can make a check to bear the roof on, like a reverse birdsmouth. But then again with the T'd 2x4's (I'd probably go 2x6's just to make me feel better) I could just lower the one 2x to bear on the beam of the roof.
 

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Renaissance Man
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I usually slam two 2x6's together in a sandwich and pepper them with nails.

Bird mouth the top cut and dig a small kicker in at the bottom - of course I'll usually have post jacks in place somewhere so I can slightly jack up the roof to release the column. stakes go down about 18" to 24"

Could also use a permanent steel or wood posts in place, then just build around it if your not changing out the footing.
 

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A peice of 2x can handle immense weight if it is straight down like a column, as long is it is prevented from bowing. The T shape makes them way more rigid to avoid bowing out and snapping under load.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks SS. That's about the angle I'll be dealing with. enough room to work. yes I'll be repouring a footing. Also the porch is supported by the column which is typical for homes of this age (1920s-30's) around here.

If 2-2x6 is enough That's what I'll go with and save myself $80
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
A peice of 2x can handle immense weight if it is straight down like a column, as long is it is prevented from bowing. The T shape makes them way more rigid to avoid bowing out and snapping under load.
Right and that's the issue. I want and need as much space as i can get around the work area. The 2x4 on it's side is only 1/2" thicker than 2 2x4's sandwiched together. I think that 3" is enough to keep it from bowing laterally but would still like a bit more mass to keep it from deflecting. I might even beef up to 2x8 because they used A LOT of wood in these houses in the 20's and the porch is a good 3' above grade making the height closer to 10' maybe a bit more
 

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really? The two 2x's are oriented in the same strand direction. The roof can only fail in 1 direction so as i see it there's only 1 direction that you need to put the strength (to a point obviously).

But if you guys thing that 2-2x8's would be enough, I'd do that. I want to have enough material that I can make a check to bear the roof on, like a reverse birdsmouth. But then again with the T'd 2x4's (I'd probably go 2x6's just to make me feel better) I could just lower the one 2x to bear on the beam of the roof.
The 2x are perpendicular to each other. And the roof can come down, or pull away, but the 2x is not perfectly vertical so there are other loads on the 2x that will make it bow.

Think about strong backs, gable ends, why trusses need to be braced so much....putting 2 pieces of lumber, perpendicular to each other and fastening them properly makes one hell of a strong member.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The 2x are perpendicular to each other. And the roof can come down, or pull away, but the 2x is not perfectly vertical so there are other loads on the 2x that will make it bow.

Think about strong backs, gable ends, why trusses need to be braced so much....putting 2 pieces of lumber, perpendicular to each other and fastening them properly makes one hell of a strong member.
I understnad that, but as i said above...a 2x4 is only 1/2" wider than 2 2x4's nailed together. I would think that 3" is enough to stop any bowing especially seeing how there are 2 other existing posts stopping the roof from moving
 

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Kowboy
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What's the benefit? did you put anything under the posts as a footing?
I run a doubled 2x10 across the corner supported by a 4x4 on each end with a screw jack and plywood pad under each end. Level the plywood and plumb the 4x's. Unlike the other methods shown, this system is adjustable so you can raise your porch a tad, then set it right down on your columns. If the 2x10s are long enough, the 4xs are out of your work area.
 
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