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I'm not so sure about being tied to one of those things when I use em.
I typically don't tie off. If it gets tippy I'd prefer to jump shop in the safest direction.
Used this today for finishing the top row of wall sheathing and for routing out and nailing off window openings. How nice was it to not be dealing with ladders on crappy soil and grade! We did decide harness always even for ourselves so we bought some brand new, nice harnesses to wear. It wasn't too bad wearing it all day. Definitely a big improvement over the cheap, entry level ones we had before.
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I'm not so sure about being tied to one of those things when I use em.
I typically don't tie off. If it gets tippy I'd prefer to jump shop in the safest direction.

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I agree for a scissor lift but if you hit a soft spot in the dirt and it sinks it probably won't tip over but there's a good chance the occupant get slingshot out of the basket.
 

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I'm not so sure about being tied to one of those things when I use em.
I typically don't tie off. If it gets tippy I'd prefer to jump shop in the safest direction.

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If I am much more then say 30 ft I tie off. And have the safety bar down. Little nervous 45 -65 ' in the air pretty careful.

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It's just always seemed counterintuitive to me.
There's not much opportunity to fall out of the basket doing normal work stuff or moving it around the job.
There is a lot of opportunity to tip the thing over, at least on most sites I've been on. If it's going over, I'm landing on something no matter what. I prefer to have the option to fling myself in whatever direction I can that will be away from the mangled metal of the machine.

But, I'm sure the requirement to tie off in those was written by people who have studied this much more than I have. At least, I hope.
 

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There was a guy who lived near me who wished he was harnessed in a boom lift 20 ft off the ground, shot himself right out of the bucket killing himself. His wife tried to sue everyone involved but got next to nothing, she did not know it was on a security camera.
 

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Ok. How would having a harness have helped him? Shoot out and then bounce back into the machine? Wouldn't that kill him just as dead?

Not being a smartypants here. Just wondered about this for a couple decades now.
There was a guy who lived near me who wished he was harnessed in a boom lift 20 ft off the ground, shot himself right out of the bucket killing himself. His wife tried to sue everyone involved but got next to nothing, she did not know it was on a security camera.
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While incidents like that are tragic indeed, I sometimes think TPTB go a little too far trying to regulate against Darwinism. Common sense says you're asking for it if you're 60' up and moving the lift over rough terrain.
yeah most of those regulations are for the insurance companies sake

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If it adjusted right, you can't be slung out of the basket normally. It alsonwill keep you attached and not falling 20 or 80 feet.

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If it adjusted right, you can't be slung out of the basket normally. It alsonwill keep you attached and not falling 20 or 80 feet.

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That’s why they require ratchet type lanyards instead of a simple rope

It helps keep you from being flung out

Harness 100% of the time in a boom lift


David
 
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