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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently I installed an exterior door in a wall where there was no door previously. I had to cut several 6 inch square holes to help pull wires and also a 3 foot wide x 14 inch hole for a header. In the past I have always taped repairs but my question is...is it necessary? All the joints have solid backing and I tapered the edges and hot mudded them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I knew that. :sad: It's not alot to do ...I just wondered. Ok on walls that have latex paint on them is there any prep needed for floating joints out? Scuff them up? (smooth walls)
 

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I knew that. :sad: It's not alot to do ...I just wondered. Ok on walls that have latex paint on them is there any prep needed for floating joints out? Scuff them up? (smooth walls)
Most likely you can get away with just floating over it. To be on the safe side, you could sand lightly and prime before mudding and taping.
 

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I knew that. :sad: It's not alot to do ...I just wondered. Ok on walls that have latex paint on them is there any prep needed for floating joints out? Scuff them up? (smooth walls)

That will work, if you want to go the extra mile spot prime the areas that you will be adding tape to, G
 

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Gene - both our posts showed at the exact same time. Since you are a mod now, does that mean I must bow out and give you all the credit that came with answering this thread?? :w00t:
 

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Gene - both our posts showed at the exact same time. And said the exact same thing Since you are a mod now, does that mean I must bow out and give you all the credit that came with answering this thread?? :w00t:
NO, the credit is all yours, my reward is just being a MOD:laughing::laughing::laughing:, GMOD
 

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Jeff
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I notice if you dont prime the area the muds gonna go over it pinholes pretty bad. Hot mud doesnt seem to do it as bad though, must be the whole moisture evaporating vs curing thing.
 

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In terms of prepping surfaces for floating patches you guys gotta try a can of spray adhesive. Just keep a can handy in your patch kit, a quick pass over the painted surfaces and then float over with your mud. Way less hassle than priming or sanding, sticks like :whistling, and you can coat right away

I'd never not tape any patch over 3-4" diameter and anything smaller I always cut the board at a 45 angle so the filler(synco confill's the best) has something to anchor onto.

You can get 12"-150' rolls of fiberglass mesh that are great for bigger patches as you can cut it to just the right size(check ebay).

One trick I've learned is to recess your tape/mesh by cutting back the paint/paper surrounding your patch using a utility knife so the patch sits flush with the existing wall - that way you don't need to float it out as much. And if your going to cut out a patch to run wires, fix plumbing, etc... - cut the patch out using your hole saw at a 45 degree angle all around. When you replace the patch it'll fit perfect and be recessed because of the material the saw removed. This in combo with above and it'll all end up sweet.


D'S
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
One trick I've learned is to recess your tape/mesh by cutting back the paint/paper surrounding your patch using a utility knife so the patch sits flush with the existing wall
I was wondering if I could do that. excellent tips.. thanks d's
 

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The purpose of the tape is to join 2 pieces of sheetrock to effectively make 1 single panel. While that obviously isn’t rocket science it stands to reason that if you have solid backing all the way around your patch there is no way the patch would move independently of the sheet surrounding it, therefore you ‘technically’ don’t need the tape. (But since it feels so wrong not to tape something like that I still usually tape it anyway.)

To get a perfect patch I usually cut out my sheetrock before I make the hole then trace it where I want the hole. Since I’ve traced the piece I’m guaranteed it’ll fit perfect and be flush. Put some backing behind it and you’re good to go. For the small patches (3” or less) I’ll make a ‘California patch’ and mud it in real good. No need for tape/backing/screws.
 

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The purpose of the tape is to join 2 pieces of sheetrock to effectively make 1 single panel. While that obviously isn’t rocket science it stands to reason that if you have solid backing all the way around your patch there is no way the patch would move independently of the sheet surrounding it, therefore you ‘technically’ don’t need the tape. (But since it feels so wrong not to tape something like that I still usually tape it anyway.)

To get a perfect patch I usually cut out my sheetrock before I make the hole then trace it where I want the hole. Since I’ve traced the piece I’m guaranteed it’ll fit perfect and be flush. Put some backing behind it and you’re good to go. For the small patches (3” or less) I’ll make a ‘California patch’ and mud it in real good. No need for tape/backing/screws.
Haven't heard the term California patch before. Had to look that one up. We call them blow out patches. Done hundreds of them myself. Maybe thousands. Or millions over the past 25 years.
 

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Not sure if its the same thing you're talking about with the "blow-out patch." Basically you cut the dimensions of your patch on the back of the sheet and cut the front ~2” larger on all sides. Break the back and peel the paper so that you have sheetrock to go in the hole and the paper on the front all the way around to cover the crack. Mud it up and stick it in place. (Hard to visualize with my lame explanation but if it’s the same thing you do I’m sure you’ll understand.)
 

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Not sure if its the same thing you're talking about with the "blow-out patch." Basically you cut the dimensions of your patch on the back of the sheet and cut the front ~2” larger on all sides. Break the back and peel the paper so that you have sheetrock to go in the hole and the paper on the front all the way around to cover the crack. Mud it up and stick it in place. (Hard to visualize with my lame explanation but if it’s the same thing you do I’m sure you’ll understand.)
Yup the same way I do it. Found the description and pics of California patch here http://jasongraphix.com/journal/drywall-patches/ [ I don't peel the paper off the wall as it shows in it's pics, I just mud the patch to the wall]

You explained it well, I understood, since I do it the same way.
 

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Jeff
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In terms of prepping surfaces for floating patches you guys gotta try a can of spray adhesive. Just keep a can handy in your patch kit, a quick pass over the painted surfaces and then float over with your mud. Way less hassle than priming or sanding, sticks like :whistling, and you can coat right away

I'd never not tape any patch over 3-4" diameter and anything smaller I always cut the board at a 45 angle so the filler(synco confill's the best) has something to anchor onto.

You can get 12"-150' rolls of fiberglass mesh that are great for bigger patches as you can cut it to just the right size(check ebay).

One trick I've learned is to recess your tape/mesh by cutting back the paint/paper surrounding your patch using a utility knife so the patch sits flush with the existing wall - that way you don't need to float it out as much. And if your going to cut out a patch to run wires, fix plumbing, etc... - cut the patch out using your hole saw at a 45 degree angle all around. When you replace the patch it'll fit perfect and be recessed because of the material the saw removed. This in combo with above and it'll all end up sweet.


D'S
Spray adhesive eh? Woulda never thought of that thx, i always got a can or 2 of it rolling around my box its some pretty handy stuff.
 

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Recently I installed an exterior door in a wall where there was no door previously. I had to cut several 6 inch square holes to help pull wires and also a 3 foot wide x 14 inch hole for a header. In the past I have always taped repairs but my question is...is it necessary? All the joints have solid backing and I tapered the edges and hot mudded them.

The deal is, if the paper is broken, it needs to be taped(paper).

But I feel that your asking "is there a way to SHORT CUT the process in a way that it won't come back on me before the warranty goes out?"

Sure is, just use MESH tape,,, thats a real good short cut that will screw the HO but it will last long enough to git yo money,,, ya know,, if your looking for a shorty,, thats basic it.

Peace
 
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