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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently cut some sections of drywall out of several walls of my home in order to correct some electrical issues. When replacing the drywall there are obvious several gaps and at some points differences in height between the original surrounding drywall and the new drywall.

Because of the differences in height and the size of the gaps in some areas (due to imperfect cutting), I am thinking of putting on a layer of joint compound to close some of the size of the gaps and level out the surface a bit more BEFORE I joint compound using tape. Is this a bad idea?

Should I just tape using a think layer of joint compound to smooth things out or is my thinking correct? I intend to skim coat after taping in either scenario to help smooth things out.
 

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:eek: Definitely prefill the gaps.
Use a setting type compound. Much stronger than the bucket pre mix mud. :thumbsup:
 

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Hair Splitter
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Repairs I mesh tape and hot mud until the final skim coat. I apply the mesh tape on the drywall. My drywaller uses paper on everything and would install it like any other installation.

So the short answer is there should be any gaps sizable enough to warrant fill. If you have sizable gaps, remove the drywall and do it right.
 

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Next time you cut a patch make it 1 inch larger than the hole. Remove 1/2" of the "rock" 4 sides, cut from the back, do not damage the face paper. Bed the hole with setting compound, place the patch in the hole, knife the 1/2" flange. Apply finish compound (spackle for you seaboarders). This makes the repair with no tape or backer.

Tom
 

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And you can always shim the repair out with heavy cardboard if it's the shallower piece...
 

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Definitely prefill with hotmud. From there, normal bed and tape.

Careful on the steps at the edge - it's easy to get the bedding mud too thin under the tape at these locations and get the tape to not stick.
 

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Hair Splitter
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Next time you cut a patch make it 1 inch larger than the hole. Remove 1/2" of the "rock" 4 sides, cut from the back, do not damage the face paper. Bed the hole with setting compound, place the patch in the hole, knife the 1/2" flange. Apply finish compound (spackle for you seaboarders). This makes the repair with no tape or backer.

Tom
I would do this on small stuff, no bigger than 4" square. After that a California patch just isn't reliable enough IMO. I have repaired too many that if they had used just one vertical backer all would have been fine. A piece of scrap and a few screws is cheap for insurance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have attached some photos of what I am left with because I may be overstating how bad it is. The long large sections came out ok and reasonably tight. It was the thin sections that essentially were to cover the small vacancies left by where a wall that was removed met the adjacent wall that were the most trouble. There was not much for the drywall to "Bite onto" and the narrow gap made hammering any new lumber to support the drywall fairly impossible.

You can see from the pictures the long pieces and the narrow one.

My biggest concern is the difference in depth as I am hoping to avoid any tape lines showing on the wall where the repairs were made. Your continued feedback is appreciated and hopefully the pictures give a better picture of how good/bad the joints are.
 

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Some shims behind the new drywall would help to make up the depth difference. If there's not enough framing or space to add framing for backing, might be best/easiest in the long run to cut the existing rock back a little further.....halfway back on the existing stud leaving half for the existing drywall and revealing half for the new patch to attach to.

Prefill as mentioned for the gaps that aren't so terrible from the looks of it. And a few more screws may be in order before taping and mudding couldn't hurt either.
 

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Drywall Slave
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I have attached some photos of what I am left with because I may be overstating how bad it is. The long large sections came out ok and reasonably tight. It was the thin sections that essentially were to cover the small vacancies left by where a wall that was removed met the adjacent wall that were the most trouble. There was not much for the drywall to "Bite onto" and the narrow gap made hammering any new lumber to support the drywall fairly impossible.

You can see from the pictures the long pieces and the narrow one.

My biggest concern is the difference in depth as I am hoping to avoid any tape lines showing on the wall where the repairs were made. Your continued feedback is appreciated and hopefully the pictures give a better picture of how good/bad the joints are.
Better you than me dude!!! My magic wand is out of order ! Laminate the entire wall with new board for a [flat] finish.
 

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Next time you cut a patch make it 1 inch larger than the hole. Remove 1/2" of the "rock" 4 sides, cut from the back, do not damage the face paper. Bed the hole with setting compound, place the patch in the hole, knife the 1/2" flange. Apply finish compound (spackle for you seaboarders). This makes the repair with no tape or backer.

Tom
I always make my blowouts with about 11/2'' all the way around
 

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I have attached some photos of what I am left with because I may be overstating how bad it is. The long large sections came out ok and reasonably tight. It was the thin sections that essentially were to cover the small vacancies left by where a wall that was removed met the adjacent wall that were the most trouble. There was not much for the drywall to "Bite onto" and the narrow gap made hammering any new lumber to support the drywall fairly impossible.

You can see from the pictures the long pieces and the narrow one.

My biggest concern is the difference in depth as I am hoping to avoid any tape lines showing on the wall where the repairs were made. Your continued feedback is appreciated and hopefully the pictures give a better picture of how good/bad the joints are.
shim that new board, looks like 5/8 would have worked better. either way you can prefill gaps with durabond, tape, and bust it out and it should be ok
 

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Drywall Slave
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shim that new board, looks like 5/8 would have worked better. either way you can prefill gaps with durabond, tape, and bust it out and it should be ok
Busting out bastard butts ??? Have fun.:thumbup:
 

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FRAME2FINISH said:
Just mix it and leave your trowel in it , then go drink a soda.

You'll swear it only took 3 minutes.
Mix it with hot water and you won't even get it all mixed.
 

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One of my painters would score and cut the paper away from the existing drywall so there's a recess for paper tape. Whenever I try it, the paper won't come off.

Next time, save your cut pieces so you won't have to shim.

This thread just gave me a eureka moment for a new and improved method of super easy and fast drywall patching. I might even become a billionaire. I'd tell you about it, but first need to develop it and get it into production. (I can't believe how easy it is.) See you in a couple years. Thanks!
 

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Where on earth is 5 min used? I have used it once to patch a hole and even with cold water by the time I got it mixed and patch the 1x1 patch it stated to set up and wouldn't have spread at all. I would hate to think how quick you have to work to get through a bag of it.
 

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Where on earth is 5 min used? I have used it once to patch a hole and even with cold water by the time I got it mixed and patch the 1x1 patch it stated to set up and wouldn't have spread at all. I would hate to think how quick you have to work to get through a bag of it.
I use 5 all the time. Mix it in the same room and you're good to go. Use it when you have a small repair and want to put more than one coat (anything to minimize sanding). Also, if you get in the habit of using a larry light when you apply, that makes it even easier to double-ckeck your finish.
 
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