Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Residential Remodeling, Cabinetry, Finish Carpentry
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought I’d share my experience with using a product that I don’t see much info on. Hopefully this will help some of you.

The product is called Sher-Wood “waterbourne white topcoat”. I think It’s available in 3 sheens (rated in degrees), and in a white or deep-base.



Short synopsis review: If you have at least mid level spraying skills and equipment, I would recommend it for new raw wood, but you also need some patience even though it dries ridiculously fast. Read the long review if you want me to explain all of that qualification.


Long review:
I wanted to use Kem Aqua+, but the customer chose a deep base color. The SW guy (at a commercial SW location) told me this was basically the same as KA+ but available in deep base. He also told me it needs manual tinting with different tint material than their other coatings.

I took his word for it and bought a gallon for a small custom island. Pricing was on par with their more premium paints and industrial coatings.

It sat for a day before I used it and when I opened it, I expected it to look like this:


But it looked like this:


Obviously this pic is not a brand new gallon, but you can see the idea. This stuff separates fast. I found that throughout the process, I had to stir the crap out of it every time I opened the can, even when it only sat for 15 minutes.

So that’s what I mean about needing patience. You can’t just stir up a gallon, dump it in your spray gun and be ready for a day of spraying. It needs to be done in small batches that will last you no more than 10 minutes. Plan ahead. Make time to have your workpieces ready to go, then stir, strain, spray, clean, repeat.

I’ll continue the review in the next post because I think Tapatalk limits pic count per post.
 

·
Registered
Residential Remodeling, Cabinetry, Finish Carpentry
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Under the impression that this was the same as KA+, I followed KA+ Instructions from tjbnwi. I thinned it 5% with distilled water and added 5% General Finishes water-base retarder, with percentages based on weight. For those unfamiliar with KA+, this helps avoid micro bubbles when it dries too fast.

The first doors were being refinished. I sanded them and sprayed them with 2 coats of BIN. I also did raw maple doors that also got 2 coats of BIN.

I sprayed with a Fuji 4 stage and started with a 1.3mm tip. It went on with a bit of initial orange peel, but it flowed out quickly. I only sprayed cabinet doors and face frame laying horizontally, but I had no issue with runs on the vertical edges. In other words, it seems to have decent holdout or “hang”.

This gave me confidence to put on a heavier coat, so the 2nd coat was heavier. This is when I noticed the spots.



They didn’t disappear when it dries either. See the door on the left with a heavy coat, vs the door on the right with a light coat:



After a bunch of trial and error, I found that it had everything to do with drying time. I was seeing the same tint separation on the panel, as I was in the can. This stuff is supposed to dry in 15 minutes and it needs to or the tint will separate. I stopped thinning and adding retarder. I also started using a 1.5mm tip and doing light-medium coats. I got the spots to stop. every coat was dry to the touch in about 10-15 mins and ready for a recoat in 20-30 mins. I generally only did 2 coats with great success. The finish was smooth and hard.



In the next post, we’ll get into the “raw wood” qualifier and summarize.
 

·
Registered
Residential Remodeling, Cabinetry, Finish Carpentry
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
So now that I was seeing a need to speed up the drying instead of slowing it, I suspected this was not the same as KA+ and finally read the data sheet.

Upon comparing data sheets, This is nothing like KA+. The viscosity is different, and there’s no need for any primer/surfacer. Where as KA+ is supposed to have a specific surfacer, this doesn’t want any at all. in fact, they say that this is it’s own surfacer and that it should be applied to raw wood with the first coat acting as a surfacer.

So I decided to put this to a test. I wasn’t having any flaking/bubbling/cracking over BIN, so I didn’t suspect any adhesion issues, but I wanted to see if this stuff really took to raw wood as well as they were claiming.

I sprayed some doors with BIN and left some raw. I applied a first coat and sanded with 220 and 320. On the BIN doors, I got down to the white BIN pretty quickly. On the raw doors, I had to work harder to get through the first coat and down to raw wood. So, based on this very unscientific test, I believe it really is optimized for raw wood and even the best primer limits it’s adhesion.

For that reason, I wouldn’t yet recommend it for cabinet re-sprays where you’ll never be completely down to clean raw wood. I also have limited experience with on vertical surfaces.

In summary:
1. Dries extremely fast. It needs to.
2. Needs constant stirring to avoid tint separation. Work in small batches.
3. Forget about thinning or any other additives.
4. Flows out quickly and dries super smooth.
5. Hard, durable finish when applied in multiple coats to raw wood.
6. Apparently it’s spray only. Have not tried brushing/rolling because I don’t think it’s gonna work .

I’ll be using it more in the future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
Good info, thanks.

My S-W rep was pushing some of this stuff to a friend and I the other day and we were pretty interested. My friend tried the clear topcoat and he was very happy. I’m going to have to find a project to try this stuff on.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top