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surfnshark
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90 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am going to install Pergo.

The current "structural" floor is tongue and groove attached to the joists. It not smooth enough for the Pergo.

So....I was told to lay down a subfloor like OSB, particle board, plywood etc.

What type of subfloor material should I use?

Thanks
 

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Registered
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5,425 Posts
"please complete your profile, and continue to the intro page and tell us a little about yourself and your professional experience, thankyou and welcome to ct". Gmod
 

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surfnshark
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90 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Choosing

Thanks,
Would you guys use OSB or nice smooth plywood (more expensive). The ground in Seaside is sandy and somewhat moist.
Cr
 

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Superior Firepower
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5,089 Posts
Thanks,
Would you guys use OSB or nice smooth plywood (more expensive). The ground in Seaside is sandy and somewhat moist.
Cr
I always go with 1/2", 5 layer, BCX.
Stagger the joints. Leave room for expansion between the sheets
and around the edges.
Typical shear panel nailing pattern (every 6" on the perimeter, every 12" in the field ).
:thumbsup:
 

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Wood Craftsman
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7,324 Posts
location?

Can I ask "where" you are putting the floor?
word to the wise: if its going in a kitchen ~ there is no way I would do that~ I would have them sign a waiver! if that gets wet (and it will) wait till you see what that is going to look like after repeated pools of spills~ not recommended in kitchens or baths~as I am sure you are aware~ it is highly advisable to think of an alternative if this is the case. :rolleyes:
Personally~ I really discourage clients from thinking about putting engineered flooring in~ first of all it's trying to imitate something that it is not and second of all - it does not stand up to normal wear and tear~ they put that in my Buddy's Police lodge and they have regretted that from day one ~ it looks bad- really bad, chips swells , large white scratches ~ maybe some guys on here like it ~ it's east to install , time saver but all in all ~ your recommendation is your credibility.
 

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Carpe Diem
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20,742 Posts
I would have them sign a waiver!
I've said it before on here and I'll continue to say, having a customer sign a waiver is a bad idea. :no:

If your waiver ever went to the legal stage, imagine what a lawyer could do against you. You are admitting that you know you are doing an installation or using a product that is not ideal for the situation. You're trying to release yourself from responsibility. But in reality, you are the professional and should be guiding the consumer, not allowing them to make bad decisions.

That said, I agree with the statements about laminate.
 

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Wood Craftsman
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7,324 Posts
waiver~ let me extrapolate

Angus,
I do agree with you ~ However~what i am saying is, and I probably`as usual, didn't explain myself enough, my apologies. ~ if I were a customer and my contractor wants me to sign a waiver~ there is obviously some reason he doesn't feel comfortable about the product i want to put in~flags should be going up. But if he/she is insistent ~ and you know, if it is the final verdict and he/she does want my company to do the job~ I would explain write from the manufacturer warrants and exclusions information that it is "highly" not recommended for areas that will contain moisture or spills and she "is" going to sign this waiver to protect myself ~ because something is going to happen to that floor and it is not going to be pretty, I know that for certain~ I personally hate that material and refuse to install it~anywhere! , but that's me. So Ditto's to you- I concur :clap:
 
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