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Home Repairs
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A real estate agent friend asked me to look at one of her clients houses today. This one was a rental, and the occupant left her dog alone for long periods of time. The lady moved out yesterday, so we went over this morning to check the place out.

The family room carpet stink is almost overwhelming and is still wet in areas where the dog had been doing it's business. I peeled back a few areas of the rug and can see that the plywood subfloor is wet also. We checked out the mud room and found areas with the same problem although it's on a slab.

Do you guys know of any treatment that I can use after the sub floors dry out to kill any remaining odor?

Thx....... John
 

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Why Does Dog Urine Smell?

Dog urine is a made up of ammonia, nitrogen, uric acid, bacteria, and hormones.
Uric acid contains crystals that are left behind even after the urine has dried.
When there is moisture in the air due to, say, high humidity, these crystals are reactivated and that's why we can smell dog urine even long after we think we have cleaned it up.

Here is an easy way to completely clean dog urine and remove the smell:
Using paper towels or a rag, absorb as much of the urine as possible.
Pour water over the area, and dry it again using paper towels - Stop only when the towels are not soaking up yellowish stains.
Spray or pour a natural cleaner over the area and let it "sit" for a while (depending on the cleaner you use - see below).
Dry the area thoroughly.


Natural Dog Urine Cleaners

White Vinegar

White Vinegar is a good and effective natural dog urine cleaner. After finishing Steps 1 and 2 described above, soak the area completely with undiluted white vinegar.
Let it soak in well and sit for several minutes before blotting the area dry.

Baking Soda

Baking soda is effective in absorbing odor. After finishing Steps 1 and 2 described above, pour enough baking soda to cover the affected area and let it sit for a few hours before vacuuming.

Hydrogen Peroxide

Add one part hydrogen peroxide to two parts water. After finishing Steps 1 and 2 described above, pour the mixture on the area and let it sit for 5-10 minutes before blotting the area dry.
 

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Stoney has some new ideas for me... gotta try them...

Otherwise, I've just used the old standards.... whack it with Natures Miracle (pet store) for a few days and cover with a heavy coat of Shellac.
 

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Only right way to do it is remove all the wet floor you can.

Any areas left, under plates etc, treat with this stuff:
It works!!!

http://www.scoe10x.com/Scripts/SCOE10X-Odor-Eliminator.asp
A friend of mine owns a carpet store and he sells a product called "UrineOut" and I bought some when I was replacing some flooring for someone. I works VERY WELL and permentaly removes the smell. It won't, however repair the rot of plywood or the swelling of MDF or particle board, so you still have that to contend with.

http://www.planeturine.com/index.cfm/ID/71/ProductPageID/2
 

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I'll have to try that, it looks good. I've always done the baking soda/peroxide thing with decent results. I've tried the UrineOut before, but it didn't work for my needs. It's geared toward carpet and pad. Most times I'm tearing out the funky carpet and installing a hard surface floor.

I Had a job a few years ago where the dogs had been pissing on the baseboards in a bedroom for so long I had to tear out rotten BB's, casings, insulation, and rock in the room. Even the insul was soaked. Was F-in DISGUSTING. Got some kind of spray from a pet store (I don't remember the name) that was high-dollar and it didn't really work all that good. Even after spraying everything in sight with oil primer, it still stunk. Smelled like a dog pissed in a paint can :laughing:
 

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A couple years back, I looked at an "interesting" prep-for-sale job in a nice neighborhood. From the outside, nice, big house, clean, well-kept. Two professionals lived there...and their fifteen rescue dogs. The dogs no longer were let outside since the neighbors kept complaining about the noise. I couldn't believe my eyes.

As we walk the job, the owners acted like it was normal. They were seeking affordable solutions for the damaged hardwood and inexpensive ways to "freshen-up" the kitchen base cabinets (urine damage) to put it on the market. I declined. They ended up using a flooring guy to refinish most of the flooring - not replace. I got called over there 6 months later for some reason, and went just to see what finally happened. I could still smell it. I don't know how the new family could stand it, and they had a baby, too. Very sad situation.
 

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dog urine smell removal

I had the same issue after purchasing a rental to renovate. There was a distinct urine smell and huge stain on the wood sub floor after the carpet was removed.
I saturated the wet area with a bleach solution as it basically kills all bacteria and viruses. I treated the area twice and the smell was gone. I then used Kilz to seal it up before having new carpet installed.
Easy and cheap way to solve the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Went back over to this house again today and pulled out all the carpet and padding. The plywood subfloor had 2 large areas of total saturation from the urine. It even smelled bad in the crawlspace. This dog must have had a bladder the size of a olympic pool. My agent friend was there to take pictures of the damages, and she was texting them to the owner who lives in Ohio as we went along. I will be cutting out about 60 S.F. of subfloor. Now they want me to refinish 828 S.F. of the original hardwood floor, repair & treat 603 S.F. of the carpeted subfloors. Skim out 2 bathrooms that had been previously tiled and repaint. Repair some serious cracking issues with the plaster ceilings throughout, and repaint all affected ceilings.

Working with real estate agents can be a PITA some times, but they keep me swamped with some pretty interesting jobs. I felt a little guilty when I told my flooring contractor friend that I will be bailing out on him next week for about 12 days to "knock this one out", but he was all for it.

Thanks for all the tips on the urine problem guys. I will be sorting through the info for a couple days to come up with a plan.

V/R........John
 

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D.E.P.S. said:
Went back over to this house again today and pulled out all the carpet and padding. The plywood subfloor had 2 large areas of total saturation from the urine. It even smelled bad in the crawlspace. This dog must have had a bladder the size of a olympic pool. My agent friend was there to take pictures of the damages, and she was texting them to the owner who lives in Ohio as we went along. I will be cutting out about 60 S.F. of subfloor. Now they want me to refinish 828 S.F. of the original hardwood floor, repair & treat 603 S.F. of the carpeted subfloors. Skim out 2 bathrooms that had been previously tiled and repaint. Repair some serious cracking issues with the plaster ceilings throughout, and repaint all affected ceilings. Working with real estate agents can be a PITA some times, but they keep me swamped with some pretty interesting jobs. I felt a little guilty when I told my flooring contractor friend that I will be bailing out on him next week for about 12 days to "knock this one out", but he was all for it. Thanks for all the tips on the urine problem guys. I will be sorting through the info for a couple days to come up with a plan. V/R........John
You have your work cut out for you...12 day's?
 
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