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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have done many many roofs where we've had to take multiple layers off, often down to wood shingles. But today I had a headache tearing shingles off of ice guard for the first time. What a royal pain! Early in the morning we were able to chip away at it with roofing shovels and flat bars. It was very tedious, but we were able to get it down to an acceptable level. Then by the time we got to the back it had warmed up (and today was not a hot day by any means) and the shingles were literally a bear to remove. We tried a pneumatic scraper, the roofing shovels, and flat bars. We asked at the building center and nobody had any suggestions of how to best get it off. Short of removing the sheeting and replacing it, I'm wondering if anyone else has any suggestions of how they have removed shingles over ice guard. Literally there was a strip of shingles almost permanently bonded to the ice guard every 5". Thanks for your help!
 

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KemoSabe
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"We've had to take multiple layers off, often down to wood shingles"


What?????
I've seen as many as 3 layers of asphalt shingles over wood shakes and skip sheathing.:blink: Not a job for the prima donna. It is dirty, dangerous work. This is one of the reasons I chose to get into new construction.:thumbup: With things the way they are, I'm glad to have had the experience as it may come full circle. Hell, it's already happening.:sad:
 

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"We've had to take multiple layers off, often down to wood shingles"


What?????
Its pretty standard around here. Id say on average 2-3 layers around here. Ive aslo seen alot of 4 layer, couple 5-6 layers, and a record of 8. Yep 8 fucing layers. The sad thing is Im biding these 12 pitch 3 layer asphalt 1 wood shake, resheath and the next guy is biding to put a lay over or metal over it. Try life in my area. I will say thanks to CT Ive become alot better at selling these tear offs. Thanks Ed, Grumpy, MJW, Doug and a few otherss:thumbsup:
 

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topsail's trimcat
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when we deal with this, we only tear off the shingles, and then resheet the whole roof. almost all of the roofs we see are t+g boards, so its common to have the nails go into the space between boards, new sheathing gives us a full nailing surface.

mind you we dont really get into the shingling, just tear offs for large additions and complete reno's. were doing quite a few in one area of town and none of the homes have a overhang, just fascia flush to the edge of hte building. so by resheeting we create a proper overhang
 

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Doing a job right now that has ice and water shield that has to be cleaned. My approach has been to pull all the nails and peel up a corner slowly with a flat bar, then peel the rest with my hands. It only seems to work when it gets sunny and hot. After its clean I put new ice and water over it. I have have to do this with osb as well, it this case I just bought new sheathing. Peeling it up destroyed the osb.
 

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Yar paper over I&W does not offer much help for this either. Have not tried anything else to seperate the shingles.

Most I've done: 4 plus shakes.

Oddest: 2 layers of 3 tabs over SLATE.
:eek:

I once did a house 2 layers shingles and 3 layers of rolled roofing over shakes. 1 of the layers of rolled roofing had like a scalloped edge that the followed with the nail pattern. Seemed like they followed the instructions with a nail every 2 inches....although in hindsight there were so many nails poking through it was tough to tell what pattern they were keeping.

I always think it's kinda rude when people on their very first post just happen to pop in and ask how to cure/fix get out of a very labor intensive project...just like HOs do. Seems to be a lot of them lately trying to save some money instead properly trying to stimulate the economy. Genecarp gave me a reminder yesterday....I needed it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for the input

Thanks for all the responses to my original post.

I've been waiting to see what everyone else would post and found it interesting that pretty quickly the discussion moved to whether we should replace the sheeting or do our best to strip it.

Far be it from me to nail down (pun intended) the final definitive answer, but I'll tell you what we ended up doing (and a little of why). The front side of the house we were able to strip successfully enough to make us happy with what we left. The back side (remember this was as the day went on and it was getting warmer) we left more on the plywood that we were really happy with. This was not a paying customer this time, it was a donation/church project that we were doing for a crisis pregnancy center. So, time was a big factor. If I had more time, and had a paying customer that was willing to pay for the sheeting, I think the right way would be to strip the sheeting and replace it. Anyway, we stripped the shingles as best we could, removed all of the nails, put down new ice guard and shingles. You could not tell after the new was down, and I have no doubt that everything will seal just fine. But no, the new ice guard was not put on the best surface.

It does make me wonder about the roofs that we're putting down that have ice guard 4 1/2' out from each valley, 6' up from the eave, around chimneys, etc. ??? I don't look forward to ever tearing those off! I guess I'll be happy tearing off the old roofs, even if they have the cedar shakes.

Thanks for your input!!!
 

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roofbutcher
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My old boss always used to tell the customers "Sorry, but I can’t guarantee those valleys because they haven’t invented Ice belt yet." And they were ok with that because nobody cared about leaks back then.


That’s why you’ll see a drainage system it the attic of any house built before 1980.


Thank god the new guys came along and solved the hundred-year-old problem of how to get a valley to work.

If you like to run ice gaurd everywhere, don't complain when it's your turn to deal with it.
 

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If MY crew is on the roof doing the job, i automatically figure just pulling up that first layer of sheeting and replacing it, a heck of alot faster, easier than doing the chip and chisel method. If i sub it out, i notice the 3 different roofing crews i use all chip and chisel, and to be completely honest, once the roof is reinstalled i cant see any diveations to know that it was a chip and chisel situation, but most of my roofing subs have larger crews whereas my crew is smaller like a navy seal team, rather have a few guys with knowledge and able to execute than a calvary full of greenhorns screwing things up for redoing.:laughing:
 

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My old boss always used to tell the customers "Sorry, but I can’t guarantee those valleys because they haven’t invented Ice belt yet." And they were ok with that because nobody cared about leaks back then.


That’s why you’ll see a drainage system it the attic of any house built before 1980.


Thank god the new guys came along and solved the hundred-year-old problem of how to get a valley to work.

If you like to run ice gaurd everywhere, don't complain when it's your turn to deal with it.
HUH!!?:shutup:
 
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