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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

I'm talking on a house repainting job. The house is 100+ years old with cedar siding; there's 3 old layers / colors of paint. It's peeling everywhere. After attempting to sand and scrap by hand it's clear that this will be far to time consuming and won't look good.

All the paint needs to be stripped off. My question is what would you recommend as the quickest / most effective way to get the paint off? I've read options like Infrared (Eco-Strip / Speedheater), Chemicals, or even something like the the Paint Shaver Pro.

What have folks found as the most effective method? Attached is a simple picture of the house for reference.

Thanks!

Pete
 

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diplomat
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Your house or are you an EPA certified RRP contractor?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Not certified, not my house but a family friend job. No doubt there's lead in the paint so I'll certainly take precautionary measures.
 

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Butcher of wood and metal
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Not certified, not my house but a family friend job. No doubt there's lead in the paint so I'll certainly take precautionary measures.
I know a lot don't care, but as a contractor and not certified one is not really suppose to work on them.

Thing is some of that old wood will not take paint like it should and last, endless job of painting. It does not take many repainting to pay for new siding.
 

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If you get caught on the job, there could be trouble.

Even if you’re just “helping out” a friend.

Contractors are the ones that are supposed to know better. The state doesn’t have a whole lot of power over HomeOwner, but they do over your licensure.

That said, maybe a heat gun?

You can heat it and Scrape it off when it bubbles. Consequently, if you accidentally catch the house on fire, it’s not so big that it would take a long time to rebuild.




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Looks like the siding has been replaced before.

There is no easy way to get all the paint off. Something that size, you may be better off removing all the siding and stripping off site, then reinstalling. Lye stripping will remove any damaged wood fibers so it's like having new wood to paint. You can also flip the biards when you reinstall.

There are a lot of prohibited practices that could be useful, but are banned. I believe I could do that whole house without triggering RRP compliance simply by making a coring drill bit out of thin wall tubing just big enough to core around each nail. The effected area is the area of the holes. You have 20sqft of area before compliance kicks in.

Strip, do any hole filling and repairs and reinstall.
 

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Are you sure there is lead. Have you swabbed it.

I've had older houses where only the trim is lead and the siding is not.

I've always had newer houses where it all is.

Swab, then come up with a plan.

If it is lead, then I would just knock the loose stuff of, prime and paint.

Most guys I know aren't doing total stripping any more.

Too much liability.

I hope your "friend" is paying you a crap ton of money, because any way you strip that is going to take a long time.

Heat is the most effective and cleanest, but slow. Just don't use a gun over 1100 watts and I think it is still allowed with RRP.

However, test it first.

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you all for jumping in with input :thumbup: I can check for lead...

Ultimately...it sounds like there's no simple solution; (A) a sh*t ton of time to strip the paint with heat, take it offsite, flip the boards, etc or (B) spend more and just straight up replace the siding.

Randy Bush said:
...thing is some of that old wood will not take paint like it should and last, endless job of painting. it does not take many repainting to pay for new siding.
This I was not aware of; isn't the quality of old cedar siding such as this far better then anything you can get today (at a reasonable price)? If all the work is put into stripping the paint the last thing I want is for the paint not to stick...
 

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Thank you all for jumping in with input :thumbup: I can check for lead...No you can't legally speaking. If by some chance EPA comes by and checks as uncertified you can be up the creek with a fine.

Ultimately...it sounds like there's no simple solution; (A) a sh*t ton of time to strip the paint with heat, take it offsite, flip the boards, etc or (B) spend more and just straight up replace the siding.



This I was not aware of; isn't the quality of old cedar siding such as this far better then anything you can get today (at a reasonable price)? If all the work is put into stripping the paint the last thing I want is for the paint not to stick...
While this may not be the case 100% of the time, depends on how bad it is now, trim boards are the worst. And with a lot of the paint today , they will be redoing it in a few years again.
 

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Are you sure there is lead. Have you swabbed it.

I've had older houses where only the trim is lead and the siding is not.

I've always had newer houses where it all is.

Swab, then come up with a plan.

If it is lead, then I would just knock the loose stuff of, prime and paint.

Most guys I know aren't doing total stripping any more.

Too much liability.

I hope your "friend" is paying you a crap ton of money, because any way you strip that is going to take a long time.

Heat is the most effective and cleanest, but slow. Just don't use a gun over 1100 watts and I think it is still allowed with RRP.

However, test it first.

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If you test it and it comes up negative, so you do all your prep and paint

You are still in violation of RRP if you aren't RRP certified
 

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Weathered fibers which cause adhesion problems come off in a lye strip. I've used lye based deck stripper with siding installed on a l8mited area before. The stuff will attack all kinds of things and kill plants. Painting after neutralization is great and you get long coating life.

I use semitransoarent 100% acrylic stain for primer most of the time and come back later for final coats
 

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If you test it and it comes up negative, so you do all your prep and paint



You are still in violation of RRP if you aren't RRP certified
True, but I figured at this point...

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I used the paint shaver pro on my house about 10 years ago. The house had 2.5 in lap siding, was a two story house. roughly 34 ft square. It did a fantastic job, had it hooked up to a vac to help keep the dust down. I think I still have it, if you want it, I am willing to sell
 

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now an expert here


couldn`t you sand-blast that sucker?
you`d have a lot of sand left over , and the wood would have that orange-peel finish , but it could strip it off pretty decent , no?

or even just pressure wash it down with a lot of pressure ,
then ,whats left is definitely on there pretty good , meaning you could
sand , and prime over it and paint

i guess it matters if the client /friend/ relative expect it to look like new wood , or doesn't mind if it isn't perfect.
if their ecpecting it to look perfect , then thats your answer , demo all the existing wood ,and start will all new wood .
 

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now an expert here


couldn`t you sand-blast that sucker?
you`d have a lot of sand left over , and the wood would have that orange-peel finish , but it could strip it off pretty decent , no?

or even just pressure wash it down with a lot of pressure ,
then ,whats left is definitely on there pretty good , meaning you could
sand , and prime over it and paint

i guess it matters if the client /friend/ relative expect it to look like new wood , or doesn't mind if it isn't perfect.
if their ecpecting it to look perfect , then thats your answer , demo all the existing wood ,and start will all new wood .
Once again no RRP should not be doing period. Responses like yours is why we have ended up with the RRP rules in the first place. Sand blasting or pressure washing , how are you going to contain it and not get the lead paint all over everything.
 
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