Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Steve
Joined
·
317 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was working with some 4/4 Cherry I bought a few years back. When I bought this I did not have my supplier Straight Line Rip one side for me.
I used double sided tape and a straight piece of cypress to make my own jig.
I had to use new tape on each board. Anyone have any other jigs to create a straight edge. My boards are 10' long in this example.
 

·
Focusing on solutions.
Hardwood floors/custom cabinets
Joined
·
5,798 Posts
Sure like my long bed jointer for the task at hand.

If that's not available, clamping the straight edge to your stock works well. Lot easier than double sided tape.

A few screws through your straightedge into the back of your stock works well too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
560 Posts
a strip of plywood .

Air brad nail it to the piece of wood overhanging it on the edge that will go against the saw fence. Keep the nails where they will be ripped off on your next tablesaw rip cut.

This gives a straight edge on one side of your wood to ride against your fence. When you rip it you have a straight cut. Then pull off the plywood and rip the other side straight and to width.

That is the quick easy method.

You could make a jig. A 'sled' to hold the board with built on clamps. The straight sled rides against the fence of the saw. The board is clamped to it.
 

·
Maker of fine kindling
Joined
·
6,199 Posts
The fastest , and possibly easiest, way is to use a nice straight stick as long as the board being straightened as your guide. Crown the board away from the straight edge and set the fence to the sum total of the two less what ever is needed to get your edge.

Push both pieces through side by side paying close attention to how you are applying pressure to the two boards so they stay nice and snug to the fence all the way through.

Takes a couple passes worth of practice and you'll have it down pretty good. Low tech, but quick and effective.

Now if you had a slider with a ten foot stroke then....:whistling:laughing:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
I use a 20' piece of 2"x3" aluminum tube to make a long fence for the unisaw. With infeed/outfeed tables I can push a stack of boards through pretty quick with excellent results. I do have to be somewhat careful not to side load the fence because it will deflect if I bully it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
Straight line rip all the time with mill-run white pine 1x 12",14", 16",18".

What I do is take a good flat board usually from the stock I'm working with snap a line at say 3-1/2" then take
1/4 ply and attach it to the line taking the time to check it with my 6'
straight edge.Than take my worm drive and run it down the edge of the ply making the board straight than take this board and clamp it on top of each board that needs to be straightened you can run through a good size pile pretty quick with this method.At this point you have a pile of boards that are ready to be sized at the table saw
 

·
Maker of fine kindling
Joined
·
6,199 Posts
Straight line rip all the time with mill-run white pine 1x 12",14", 16",18".

What I do is take a good flat board usually from the stock I'm working with snap a line at say 3-1/2" then take
1/4 ply and attach it to the line taking the time to check it with my 6'
straight edge.Than take my worm drive and run it down the edge of the ply making the board straight than take this board and clamp it on top of each board that needs to be straightened you can run through a good size pile pretty quick with this method.At this point you have a pile of boards that are ready to be sized at the table saw
What kinda clamp?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
What kinda clamp?
Deep throated Bessie's or vice grip C-clamps

Usually this stock is longer 16' or so we use 2 men one on each end take the straighting board set on top of board to be straightened line it up so you take any wane or other defect clamp, one guy runs the saw the other manges the cord and scarp, repeat...
 

·
Working
Joined
·
4,127 Posts
I use a 20' piece of 2"x3" aluminum tube to make a long fence for the unisaw. With infeed/outfeed tables I can push a stack of boards through pretty quick with excellent results. I do have to be somewhat careful not to side load the fence because it will deflect if I bully it.
I second this.
I use a 1"x4" aluminum tube that is 12' long cost $50 at the local metal yard. Straight as an arrow.
 

·
Motorboatin' son of a ...
Joined
·
1,104 Posts
I was working with some 4/4 Cherry I bought a few years back. When I bought this I did not have my supplier Straight Line Rip one side for me.
I used double sided tape and a straight piece of cypress to make my own jig.
I had to use new tape on each board. Anyone have any other jigs to create a straight edge. My boards are 10' long in this example.
That's what a jointer is for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,067 Posts
yeah a jointer! then after 5 or 6 passes you can break for lunch and finish it when you get back!

make a straightline jig..it's not rocket surgery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,530 Posts
The fastest , and possibly easiest, way is to use a nice straight stick as long as the board being straightened as your guide. Crown the board away from the straight edge and set the fence to the sum total of the two less what ever is needed to get your edge.

Push both pieces through side by side paying close attention to how you are applying pressure to the two boards so they stay nice and snug to the fence all the way through.

Takes a couple passes worth of practice and you'll have it down pretty good. Low tech, but quick and effective.

Now if you had a slider with a ten foot stroke then....:whistling:laughing:
:rockon:
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top