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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Help me understand how to best specify this condition. To be built in the TX hill country, using the indigenous limestone found there, everything sawn and chopped, nominal thickness around 4-1/2".

Want lintels and sills as seen in photo attached here.

I've noted that sawn lintels project slightly from surround stone surface, and wonder whether it is a.) simply because they are set that way, or b.) they are set that way because their angle-seat boosts it out, or c.) they are simply thicker than the stone surround.

So, what do you think the drawing called out for this lintel in the photo?

And for the sill, is is a simple square-cut section, set up tilted to drain, or is the cross section more complex, with a level bottom and a slope cut on the top. What do you think happened here?
 

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It could be a 5 inch lintel or just bumped out. Easy enough. The sills are probably just cocked to the angle.
 

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I tend to keep the stone lintels flush with the brick/ stone surrond, this will prevent water sitting on top and freezing in the winter, I have installed these with steel lintels underneath as it was called for, but also with steel lintels over top, this takes the weight and you can't see it. Also with no steel at all, depending on the width of the window.

The sill under the window are laid at a slight angle to allow water to run off, with a drip edge cut into the underside of it.

Above windows as JBM said, min 6" bearing
Under the window I go with the width of the brick I am using, e.g if I am using ontario size brick I leave the sill 4" wider on each side of the window, and so on.
 

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Looks like there's a joint over that window on the far right, I'd guess there is an angle iron under it.
 

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Are you asking how to word it in the specs? Stone lintel to project 1/2" beyond face of surrounding stone. That's about how i usually see it. or just a note on the drawing that says 1/2" proj typ. Typically it's the same thickness and just bumped out but it can certainly be thicker if you want it.

And my building code says that the only acceptable lintels are steel or re-inforced concrete. Other than that it's arches.
 

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I do not think there is any angle under or above those lintels, although there are weeps as there should be. If you are having the stone milled, get them to add the chamfer on top and cut the drip on the sill, if just using stock, tilt it (but still cut the drip into it).
 

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Never double linteled any window/door/masonry opening as S.U.M suggested or implied. If your worried about weight then increase bearing distance per sides of opening your intending to span, and or beef lintel thickness as well as the back or vertical section of lintel. For example you use 4"×4" go 4"×6".We are currently setting out 1/2" precast accent band which happens to hit top of windows and doors. Over the windows and doors we are bearing 8" standard practice for masonry openings bigger than 3'. On said lintels stainless drip edge the full length of lintel which keep in mind is 1/2" out set from face wall as is the rest of accent band. This forms a natural occurring drip edge on the sections not occurring over a door or window. The wall line on top of precast returns back the 1/2" of the out set. On top of band stainless drip edge is placed to shed water from setting on top of band. As a general rule we do use reliving angle when masonry is to reach elevations higher than 28'. As the job we are doing now does. Relieving generally occurs at no more than second floor the first time some jobs 24' but most newer construction 28' as finished floors or stories are 14'. Older buildings it was 24' as finished floor or stories were 12'. And of course we are flashing in conjunction with the drip edge occurrences including weep/vents and mortar net.
 

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Are you asking how to word it in the specs? Stone lintel to project 1/2" beyond face of surrounding stone. That's about how i usually see it. or just a note on the drawing that says 1/2" proj typ. Typically it's the same thickness and just bumped out but it can certainly be thicker if you want it.

And my building code says that the only acceptable lintels are steel or re-inforced concrete. Other than that it's arches.
Same for my jobs only galvanized lintels not raw steel or fire resistant painted or any paint for that matter.
 

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After looking closer at the image blown up, there definitely is no steel under the upstairs window in the gable.
 

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The 2" slabs under the double window is pretty slick, I would never have thought life is that easy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Speaking of galvanized, it bring up a point of interest about this finely-built house, one I've toured three times. All the fascia, rake, soffit, the skylight boxes (stubby chimney-like things on the ridge), the chimney, and parts of the sidewalls, all are G90 bright spangled galvanized. No wood or paint anywhere.

Thanks for looking and commenting. I know how to draw and note the details now.
 

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I don't know if that chimney is functional but sure looks to low? Looking at photo closer looks like there is a sag in large header piece/lintel. As far as sills we are using chamfered/beveled cut sill stone/precast, that window sill pan covers top flat portion before bevel begins. I think I forgot to mention every thing is split face, including accent band.
 

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Speaking of galvanized, it bring up a point of interest about this finely-built house, one I've toured three times. All the fascia, rake, soffit, the skylight boxes (stubby chimney-like things on the ridge), the chimney, and parts of the sidewalls, all are G90 bright spangled galvanized. No wood or paint anywhere.

Thanks for looking and commenting. I know how to draw and note the details now.
Much more eye appealing for sure, also maintenance reducing. The stainless drip edge also conceals the lintel. Also steel does flex, expand and contract to aid in controlling this naturally occurring tendency engineers are adding control joints at ends of lintels. Then of course backer rod and color matching caulk is installed after masonry is completed, along with expansion rubber set back 3/4" as masonry is placed.
 
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