Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 20 of 66 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've always used stick nailers and now I'm considering buying coil nailers. Just wondering what pros and cons there is to using coil nailers. I was reading reviews on some bostitch n89 and n80 guns, does anyone run these and whats your opinion on them, any issues?
 

·
Premium Member
Honolulu, Hawaii
Joined
·
17,459 Posts
I've always used stick nailers and now I'm considering buying coil nailers. Just wondering what pros and cons there is to using coil nailers. I was reading reviews on some bostitch n89 and n80 guns, does anyone run these and whats your opinion on them, any issues?
I've got a N85:blink::no: It'd make a good boat anchor:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Ive always used stick, then I worked last summer for a guy who runs senco coil nailers. Now im with a bigger more stable outfit, and back to the stick nailers.

I love coil nailers, a coil is just so many more nails then a couple sticks, so when your doing sheathing, you really notice the difference how often you need to stop and reload. Also cant remember those coil nailers jamming once all summer, sticks seem to get jammed up too often. Im curious if the coil nails are more expensive?
 

·
Framing Contractor
Joined
·
427 Posts
I'm running N89c's right now. For me the nails are cheaper than stick nails. Only thing I don't like about using them is you can keep a coil in your pouch, cause it can get crushed easily and then it wont feed smoothly in the gun. I bought 3 used N89c on ebay for $125 each.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Having a hundred or so nails in the gun is much better than having a hundred in your pouch. Especially for production framing. If you're renovating or otherwise and need to get into a smaller space stick is better.

Personally I only run coils.
 

·
KemoSabe
Joined
·
14,233 Posts
I always run stick nailers. If you set your belt up correctly, you can easily carry enough sticks to get through any wall frame and back to the box.

I'm left handed and coil nailers are more awkward for me to use. For decking it's a toss-up, but wall framing and sheathing I prefer sticks.

Us old bass turds need to stand up straight and stretch every hundred nails anyway.:whistling
 

·
Artist and not a curator
Joined
·
10,613 Posts
I have plenty of coil guns and use them only for sheathing. We have to nail roughly 6"oc (code gets all messed up but you can figure that many nails per sheat) so a stick gun is impossible with how often you'd have to reload.

Weight and see. I'm serious just see later on in life how much your elbow will hate you after lifting a fully loaded coil gun day in and day out. Not to mention how often you misplace a coil, or when one rolls away and destroys itself, or when the lumber yard sells you the biggest garbage box of nails and they interlock in the coild pissing you off to no end and refuse to shoot until they come out 2 at a time and you end up with one in your forearm somehow.

Not that the last part has ever happened to me:whistling. Just seems to be a nail problem not particularly a gun problem. I don't mind carrying around 10 or 12 sticks of nails personally.

Don't use the Senco's, I'd go bostich or Hitachi (I've gone Hitachi throughout now). My Senco the o-rings go bad all the time and my guys are really good about oiling too, just in the shop more than its in anyone's hand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,005 Posts
I worked for 16 years running a production framing crew. Always ran Hitachi coils.

By the way, I am left handed and it was a short learning curve on how to use them efficiently.

When I buy guns in the way past it was always stick nailers, which I always found large and cumbersome.

I think we ran through 3 skids of nails in average month. About 50 boxes a slid. Lot's of nails. I would not even want to contemplate having to pay a man to reload the sticks all of the time...:whistling
 

·
KemoSabe
Joined
·
14,233 Posts
I worked for 16 years running a production framing crew. Always ran Hitachi coils.

By the way, I am left handed and it was a short learning curve on how to use them efficiently.

When I buy guns in the way past it was always stick nailers, which I always found large and cumbersome.

I think we ran through 3 skids of nails in average month. About 50 boxes a slid. Lot's of nails. I would not even want to contemplate having to pay a man to reload the sticks all of the time...:whistling
I'd wager it's less than 5 seconds to reload a stick nailer and you're back in business. I wrestled with the coil nailers for what seemed like several minutes to get the coil situated, fed properly, get the cover aligned and clipped. Stick nailers are just my preference, no right or wrong, but I can't say that I ever thought much time was wasted reloading. I just don't see it as a factor, especially when you can carry a dozen clips in your belt easily.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,062 Posts
We are fortunate enought to use Max HP nailers. so the weight is probably on par with a stick nailer.

I know it comes down to how fast a person can do this or that. My argument in favor of coil for us is that the guns aren't heavier, we reload less, much much less weight in the bags, and convenience.

I can't/won't argue one way or the other. I just prefer using coil nailers. When we use stick, it is because we need to use HD galv. I hate it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
451 Posts
I used Hitachi coil nailers for years, but when my trailer got stolen I replaced the Hitachi with Porter Cable. I wasn't doing a lot of framing at the time, and didn't see the need in paying so much for Hitachi. I loved the it, but honestly haven't had a problem with the PC coil framer yet, and it's been over a year.

Again, I am not a framer by trade so mine doesn't get used daily.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
We are fortunate enought to use Max HP nailers. so the weight is probably on par with a stick nailer.

I know it comes down to how fast a person can do this or that. My argument in favor of coil for us is that the guns aren't heavier, we reload less, much much less weight in the bags, and convenience.

I can't/won't argue one way or the other. I just prefer using coil nailers. When we use stick, it is because we need to use HD galv. I hate it.[/QUOTE

Why is it that you guys switch over to stick to run HD nails? I see they are available online for the coil guns.
 

·
Custom Builder
Joined
·
1,412 Posts
We are fortunate enought to use Max HP nailers. so the weight is probably on par with a stick nailer.

I know it comes down to how fast a person can do this or that. My argument in favor of coil for us is that the guns aren't heavier, we reload less, much much less weight in the bags, and convenience.

I can't/won't argue one way or the other. I just prefer using coil nailers. When we use stick, it is because we need to use HD galv. I hate it.
Are those the High pressure ones?
 

·
Forming and Framing
Joined
·
6,273 Posts
ive done alot of work with coils and i seem to like them,
like the dudes said above, there is more nails in the gun. there shorter for nailing in short spaces and they look cooler.

When i first started i was using sticks and i thought they were easier to frame walls with, but

sticks do make me put less nails (the proper amount of nails) because i know i have to stop more if i put alot in :whistling

Id be happy with any, but i haven't really had time to get a favorite
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Could argue this all day. Coils are hands down better for sheathing. The problem with coil nailers is they have more working parts, (ie; the advancer) and a basket with a piece of plastic to adjust that can break. A stick nailer has a spring. Need full head nails or prefer ardox nails go coiler because the popcorn plastic collated ones shoot stuff at your face and hold even less nails. Paper tape nails don't work well in wet climates and paslode seems to still have some isues with there glue coalation on there new nails plus generics nails are usually cheaper. There seems to be more selection of coils just because there is one kind. 15 degree; where as sticks seem to have three common nail types, 28degree 33 degree and 20 degree.

Coil nailers apparently can cause tendonitis in the wrist from the nails wobbling in the basket. My choice is a coil gun for the following reasons, cheaper nails, full head nails, more choice in nails (ie; smooth, ardox and the galvies are way cheaper), longer without reloading, dont have keep them in pouch, good performance in the rain vs paper tape and excelent performance thru gang nails unlike 28 degree wire weld and a more balanced gun for most applications, and easier to pull out nails as long as they are smooth when something does go wrong. But framers are a stubborn bunch and slow to change sometimes.

I've had this discussion with the pasloade rep before and he says his data points to sticks being better. On multi unit prefab this is what I do. Coils for all wall building and sheathing. Coils for floor sheathing and roof sheathing. Coils for multiple ply trusses. Paper tape stick nails for micro / timber engineered lumber fastening with air nailers. Paper tape nails with im90 nailguns for floor joist erection and wall standing with bracing.

Hitachi, Max, Paslode are the only serious choice for coil nailers for me in this cold climate. Would like bostich but are to heavy and have had problems since went to new style especialy in cold weather. Bostich might be best in factory controlled conditions or warmer climates.

Could go on for longer but not right now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,062 Posts
Are those the High pressure ones?
Yeah. I think that you can find good deals on them too. On the compressor as well. We have had no problems with the guns, hoses or compressor in 3 years of solid use.

By the way, I didn't get a chance to call you last week. But we hope to be down there in August. We just landed a custom that we can start almost right away on the foundation. So I'm hoping to come to Sunriver.

A lot of remodeling going on in Sunriver. They said that levels are rising back to 2007 levels.

I brought back 10 Barrel ISA and Insidious Porter. I may have one tonight :) We also hit the Bedistillery which was cool.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,005 Posts
I'd wager it's less than 5 seconds to reload a stick nailer and you're back in business. I wrestled with the coil nailers for what seemed like several minutes to get the coil situated, fed properly, get the cover aligned and clipped. Stick nailers are just my preference, no right or wrong, but I can't say that I ever thought much time was wasted reloading. I just don't see it as a factor, especially when you can carry a dozen clips in your belt easily.
Trust me, I can load a coil as fast as you can a stick....

Less loads= less wasted time standing up instead of nailing. I always found the need after one coil to stand up and stretch the back as I load. with sticks, somehow my rhythm was always off.

Personally, I think either are a lot better than you and I learned!:laughing: Hand nailing is for the birds!!!!:whistling
 

·
KemoSabe
Joined
·
14,233 Posts
Trust me, I can load a coil as fast as you can a stick....

Less loads= less wasted time standing up instead of nailing. I always found the need after one coil to stand up and stretch the back as I load. with sticks, somehow my rhythm was always off.

Personally, I think either are a lot better than you and I learned!:laughing: Hand nailing is for the birds!!!!:whistling
I feel the whole "More nails per load" thing. My feeling is this.

When running decking, I always found that one guy runs for a a sheet, flops/tacks it while another is staying ahead gluing and the third man is gunning them off.

I never had a gun man waiting for a flop and tack once we got rolling, so reload time is a chance for him to straighten his back every two sheets.

Same with sheathing. We always found a rhythm that kept us all busy and fighting to get ahead or caught up, again, the gun man was always right behind us, but rarely waiting for a sheet to be set.

When gunning walls, I had two guys stocking and myself gunning them together in most cases. On very long walls, maybe one reload was required for each end. Smaller walls, 2 clips always got me to the other end and reload was done while switching sides, whether it be a single clip or two.

During floor, ceiling and roof framing, reload time was also a chance for me to look for mistakes and keep an eye on the guys.

I really can't say that reload time was wasted time for me. Always doing 2 things at once. As for the crew, if I lost a single man hour per day total for reloads on a busy day, I'd be astonished.

At most, that would be a close second to reloading coils, unless you're walking to the box for coils each time, then I think I may have the advantage.
 
  • Like
Reactions: FramingPro
1 - 20 of 66 Posts
Top