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Builder
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32,685 Posts
For framing will Holladay was a beast and his Books The Roof Cutters Secrets, The Complicated Roof workbook and his story Above the The Top Plates were all exceptional.

Mussels Roof Framers Bible

Marshall Gross Roof Framing

Rob Thallon A Graphic Guide to Frame Consteuction

Business-

Running a Successful Construction Company by David Gerstal

Nail your Numbers by David Gerstal

I highly recommend NAHB Graduate Master Remodeler and Graduate Master Builder programs, they changed my life and career. I suggest in person classes which will require travel. It starts with an assessment test and classes to test for Certified Graduate Builder and Certified Graduate Remodeler. You have to be a VGR for 9 years before you can even test for GMR, GMB is easier but just as indepth. Everything from sales, estimating, Financials, project management, scheduling, land acquisition, contracts etc... i have taken all the courses offered not just those required over the last 13 years
 

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Goin' Down in Flames....
Highwayman
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8,026 Posts
Book recommendations:

Carpentry by Leonard Koel

Measuring, Marking and Layout by Jon Carroll

Working Alone by Jon Carroll

The Very Efficient Carpenter by Larry Haun

Use caution with Larry Hauns book, as some methods are outdated, but all in all a good read.

If you do any roof cutting, Marshall Gross has an excellent book. Some folks will get on me for recommending that one, but if you want to know the principles behind the methods, that’s an excellent book.

Also, The Roof Cutters Secrets by Will Holliday

If you any form work, I highly recommend Formwork by Leonard Koel
 

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Goin' Down in Flames....
Highwayman
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8,026 Posts
That was back when people actually apprenticed young guys. I was 19 when I became a lead, I'm sure I wasn't ready but we got everything built, I kept my crews together for my employers and everyone of them offered me a raise to stay until started contracting at 26. Probably ly wasn't ready for that either but hey lol
I know for a fact I wasn’t ready to go out on my own when I did. 😳🙄👍
 

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Builder
Joined
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32,685 Posts
Book recommendations:

Carpentry by Leonard Koel

Measuring, Marking and Layout by Jon Carroll

Working Alone by Jon Carroll

The Very Efficient Carpenter by Larry Haun

Use caution with Larry Hauns book, as some methods are outdated, but all in all a good read.

If you do any roof cutting, Marshall Gross has an excellent book. Some folks will get on me for recommending that one, but if you want to know the principles behind the methods, that’s an excellent book.

Also, The Roof Cutters Secrets by Will Holliday

If you any form work, I highly recommend Formwork by Leonard Koel
I hadn't heard of Koel. I'll order that form book
 

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Builder
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32,685 Posts
This is what's left of my construction and business library, it's in my office in town. Might be a few old texts at the house. These are the weaker books really I've given away most of the good ones

HH Siegele Steel Square is a bad ass text, Carpentry is outdated but for a building nerd is still really good

like 7Delta said The Very Effecient Carpenter is in that library and ive watched a lot of his videos but not only is it outdated he was a production framer, so while many good tricks there it's not what we do so a lot of it didn't translate. I have a tremendous amount of respect for Larry Hauns career and passing it on to the new generations. Fun fact I read his book A Carpenters Life (easy read read it in two evenings on vacation) Larry Haun was a Navy Seabee during the Korean War
Bookcase Shelf Furniture Book Publication
Shelf Bookcase Wood Shelving Publication
Azure Rectangle Font Wood Material property
Wood Font Publication Revolver Book cover
 

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Instead of just being productive have a goal set each day so you can work downhill with a purpose. I like to meditate on how I want to cut up the project beforehand and organize my plans around that and bullet point it the night before. Set realistic goals to accomplish each day and if you get those tasks done early leave early as a reward but don't bite off more than you can chew. Break up the job in bite sizes and write it down on paper to get it out of your head that way you'll work fast and efficient without thinking because most of your energy is mental not physical. Also limit distractions and organize your job site so everything is clear as day. Everyone's phone gets put on vibrate and unless it's an emergency no playing on that thing until break unless you're the boss. Maintaining your concentration and focus throughout the project is the hardest part. Treat it like a marathon.
 

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We had a textbook in vocational class that they were replacing, so we were allowed to keep them. Probably 400 pages, and I remember not even wanting one. After being employed for a year or two, I leafed through it and was amazed at what was in there. No clue what it was, or what happened to it.
 

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I've always been an animal, shooting for getting as much done in a day no matter what. You burn through lazy guys fast that way. The guys we've ended up with who love to giver are fantastic.

Running a crew at 20 has some challenges, especially with the guys being about the same age as you. I guess so long as everyone is striving for efficiency you may want to be open minded to their idea's as you really might not know a whole lot more than they do. Be more of a leader than a boss so to speak. Bottom line, efficiency and no slacking should yield good results.

Take care of your body too. I started at Carpentry/framing at 17 and now at 29 I'm starting to feel it. I definitely made some mistakes. Don't "ego lift" any heavy walls! Would be a lot worse had I not eaten well and worked out along the way. You need muscle built from a controlled environment to protect your joints that are going to get hammered in an uncontrolled environment.

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Another book to add to the list that I don't think was mentioned is:

Precision Framing by Rick Arnold & Mike Guertin. Go browse through the JLC website and the Fine Home Building website. Bunch of stuff there on framing. I have found the manufacturer websites can actually be pretty helpful. Look up the install instructions, sometimes they have a tip. They will at least tell you the proper way to install their product.

As everyone has said, plan your day out the night before. Make a schedule and decide who is going to be doing what when. For example, if you were starting to frame first floor walls a schedule could be:

8 - 8:30am Setup for day ( everybody)
8:30 - 9:30am. Lay out walls ( you & 1 helper)
Start cutting window & door parts; headers, jacks, sills, cripples ( your other skilled worker).
Sort & Spread Lumber. ( your other laborer)

That's just an example.
 
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