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How old are you?

Traditionally, it took several years just to become a journeyman, and then several more years to be a supervisor, and then some time as super before one went out on his own.

There a plenty of people who didn’t follow this traditional path and are quite competent at their trade.

But, it will come with a good deal of head scratching I’m sure.

If I were you, I would pick up some textbooks and study my ass off at nights. 👍

That was back when people actually apprenticed young guys. I was 19 when I became a lead, I'm sure I wasn't ready but we got everything built, I kept my crews together for my employers and everyone of them offered me a raise to stay until started contracting at 26. Probably ly wasn't ready for that either but hey lol
 

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For framing will Holladay was a beast and his Books The Roof Cutters Secrets, The Complicated Roof workbook and his story Above the The Top Plates were all exceptional.

Mussels Roof Framers Bible

Marshall Gross Roof Framing

Rob Thallon A Graphic Guide to Frame Consteuction

Business-

Running a Successful Construction Company by David Gerstal

Nail your Numbers by David Gerstal

I highly recommend NAHB Graduate Master Remodeler and Graduate Master Builder programs, they changed my life and career. I suggest in person classes which will require travel. It starts with an assessment test and classes to test for Certified Graduate Builder and Certified Graduate Remodeler. You have to be a VGR for 9 years before you can even test for GMR, GMB is easier but just as indepth. Everything from sales, estimating, Financials, project management, scheduling, land acquisition, contracts etc... i have taken all the courses offered not just those required over the last 13 years
 

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Book recommendations:

Carpentry by Leonard Koel

Measuring, Marking and Layout by Jon Carroll

Working Alone by Jon Carroll

The Very Efficient Carpenter by Larry Haun

Use caution with Larry Hauns book, as some methods are outdated, but all in all a good read.

If you do any roof cutting, Marshall Gross has an excellent book. Some folks will get on me for recommending that one, but if you want to know the principles behind the methods, that’s an excellent book.

Also, The Roof Cutters Secrets by Will Holliday

If you any form work, I highly recommend Formwork by Leonard Koel
I hadn't heard of Koel. I'll order that form book
 

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This is what's left of my construction and business library, it's in my office in town. Might be a few old texts at the house. These are the weaker books really I've given away most of the good ones

HH Siegele Steel Square is a bad ass text, Carpentry is outdated but for a building nerd is still really good

like 7Delta said The Very Effecient Carpenter is in that library and ive watched a lot of his videos but not only is it outdated he was a production framer, so while many good tricks there it's not what we do so a lot of it didn't translate. I have a tremendous amount of respect for Larry Hauns career and passing it on to the new generations. Fun fact I read his book A Carpenters Life (easy read read it in two evenings on vacation) Larry Haun was a Navy Seabee during the Korean War
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