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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi All,

So I'm thinking of starting a low voltage contracting company in California and had a few questions. Ive got 2 retail clients who will get me on board, but I want to make sure I know what im getting into. We do mostly Voice and Data with the occasional alarm systems.

If I'm using my own guys locally for adds, moves and changes do I need to be a licensed C-7 low voltage systems contractor?

Do I need to be C-7 low voltage systems licensed if I have licensed technicians who work for me directly?

I know there are several low voltage companies who are not licensed, but still operate business. What are the consequences for performing low voltage work without a C-7 low voltage systems license?

Same goes for hiring subs in different ares of the US.

Ive worked for another company for the past 10 years, I just dont know whats required for starting up your own company in this field. Ive done some searching through state and government sites, Just wanted to see what the company owners have to say. If I need to get the license, I will.

For the typical sarcastic replying forum members:
I'm not looking for sarcasm, I'm asking for support as that is what forum boards are for. Ive gone through several posts in this forum and noticed a lot of useless sarcastic reply's to questions.

Thanks for the help!
 

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Synacom
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Starting A Low Voltage Cabling Company And Had Some Questions

Since the laws vary between states, my comment is based on laws here in NY and several other states we work in.

If you are working in a state that requires a license and you are the one contracted to do the work, you need the license because you are the one responsible for ensuring compliance with codes, standards and laws. You should also make sure you have the required liability and comp insurance. I was in alarm school last year with an electrical contractor who was fined ten thousand dollars for not having an alarm license which also covers the CCTV cameras he was installing. It is possible that one of the guys you use can be considered the "qualifier" for your company but he would have to be an employee or on retainer instead of an independent subcontractor. I am an employee and qualifier for Synacom because I hold a number of licenses and certifications. As an electrical contractor, we use licensed electricians but the company itself does not need a license. In TN, we are also required to have a contractors license for jobs over a certain amount.

Bottom line... find out what is required, spend the money, take the class, get the license, get the insurance and you will a lot better off in the long run.

Marty
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Since the laws vary between states, my comment is based on laws here in NY and several other states we work in.

If you are working in a state that requires a license and you are the one contracted to do the work, you need the license because you are the one responsible for ensuring compliance with codes, standards and laws. You should also make sure you have the required liability and comp insurance. I was in alarm school last year with an electrical contractor who was fined ten thousand dollars for not having an alarm license which also covers the CCTV cameras he was installing. It is possible that one of the guys you use can be considered the "qualifier" for your company but he would have to be an employee or on retainer instead of an independent subcontractor. I am an employee and qualifier for Synacom because I hold a number of licenses and certifications. As an electrical contractor, we use licensed electricians but the company itself does not need a license. In TN, we are also required to have a contractors license for jobs over a certain amount.

Bottom line... find out what is required, spend the money, take the class, get the license, get the insurance and you will a lot better off in the long run.

Marty
Thanks for the reply Marty, Im currently looking into getting the license anyways. Ive heard horror stories like that before, in fact just heard about it today with a general contractor not having the necessary licenses at a job site today. They shut him down and we couldn't do our work since theirs was put on hold.
I was hoping to find a quicker way at getting your license, that so far that doesn't look possible in California.
 
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