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Pricing a 40'x80' shop and the walls are 20' 2x6 12" o.s, now this is a bigger job then I'm used to but trying to get my name out there on bigger projects.

May real question is other then the obvious Crane or tele handler is there a way to stand these walls up?

Thanks
 

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Forming and Framing
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Pricing a 40'x80' shop and the walls are 20' 2x6 12" o.s, now this is a bigger job then I'm used to but trying to get my name out there on bigger projects.

May real question is other then the obvious Crane or tele handler is there a way to stand these walls up?

Thanks
Possibly wall jacks, as far as i am concerned for the sake of efficiency and safety a zoom boom is the best. I assume the zoom boom would be on site at all times, making it convenient to stand walls as they are built, as opposed to a crane where you would either have to call it multiple times or build a whole wack of walls to stand at once.
 

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Always Learning
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How many on your crew? I watched a crew of 8 build 18' 2x6 walls in sections and stand them and lift them up onto a 2' stem wall.
 

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I prefer carpenter
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I have lifted these size of walls way to many times, every way possible. Lots of guys, fork lift, crane, wall jacks, etc. The problem with each way with the exception of the crane is guys get scared and then things get scary. I have never had a issue with any of the walls going up but a few close calls. So the last say 5 years or so we only lift walls of this size with a crane
 

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I built a 40'x60' with 16' 2x4 walls by myself. I think the method I used is called Arkansas framing. Basically, after bolting down all the plates, I started at the corners and then stood up studs about 8' apart and braced them off. Then, I put up the 16' top plates. Then, I installed the rest of the studs and door window assemblies. I used a compact track loader with a 12' wide platform to install the sheathing. I did have a helper the day the trusses were delivered.
 

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Double post.
 

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If you're asking me, three long weeks. That included 4 windows, 1 door, 3-14x10'6" overhead door openings, decking and cornice work but not the siding. Only one interior wall across the 40' part. Sheathing was 23/32" T&G OSB.
 

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We build large walls all the time. I have found it easier to build them standing in place. This way no one gets killed and the wall isn't half torn apart trying to lift it. Mind you we do custom work and we don't care if it takes a bit longer. I don't think in the long run it takes much longer. Savings on not needing the crane as well.
 

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We did a garage recently that had 16' walls on top of a 3' stem wall. We built 16' long wall panels. Installed the sph6's from bottom plate to studs. Sheathed the first thre coarses but left space so that when we set the next panel we could throw a piece of sheathing that connected each panel 4' on each side. Then we added the second top plate to tie them all together. Total run was 90' on the long sides. Used a lull and 4 guys. While the lull set the wall in place, we braced plumbed and braced it then used titen hd's to secure bottom plate to the stem wall. We also added htt5's to the end studs and lagged the end studs where the panels met. Hope that makes sense.
 

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We had an unfortunate incident once with a 12' long 18' high wall. It's much heavier than one thinks. We were lucky no one was killed. 3 guys tried.

We have had a few that were close, but I always secure the bottoms of long walls with a few pieces of metal lumber strap. I have a pretty good knack of knowing what we can and can't lift. We try to lift our large walls at the same time that we do some other crane lifting. Many times I have built tall walls on the second floor and slid them over an open foyer or great room. A much better vantage point when lifting.
 

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How long is the wall? We used to lift two story balloon walls that were about 18' high, 35' long, but only half the length of the wall was ballooned. No forklift, no jacks, about 7 or 8 people, just grabbed it and lifted it. The only trick we used was nailing a long 2x4 to the top of the ballooned section and having one guy use it as a handle to help push. We also nailed metal banding to the bottom plate to keep the bottom from kicking up or sliding off the wall as we lifted. We only had one accident, which was caused because one crew attempted the lift with only about four people.

The safest way is with a GradeAll fork lift, I'd suggest doing it if you can get one in there. Btw Knucklehead, boom forklifts can reach four stories, they can deal with a 20' wall easy.
 

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diplomat
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I lifted 45x16' fully sheathed walls pretty easy with an all terrain forklift. They weighed about 4000 pounds. 2x8 construction. Well worth the machine rental.
 

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We had an unfortunate incident once with a 12' long 18' high wall. It's much heavier than one thinks. We were lucky no one was killed. 3 guys tried.
Been there. About 1/2 way stood up 2/3 of the wall was behind and over our head. 26' gable 10/12. 9 guys and still couldn't make it happen. Scary stuff.
 

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How long is the wall? We used to lift two story balloon walls that were about 18' high, 35' long, but only half the length of the wall was ballooned. No forklift, no jacks, about 7 or 8 people, just grabbed it and lifted it. The only trick we used was nailing a long 2x4 to the top of the ballooned section and having one guy use it as a handle to help push. We also nailed metal banding to the bottom plate to keep the bottom from kicking up or sliding off the wall as we lifted. We only had one accident, which was caused because one crew attempted the lift with only about four people.

The safest way is with a GradeAll fork lift, I'd suggest doing it if you can get one in there. Btw Knucklehead, boom forklifts can reach four stories, they can deal with a 20' wall easy.
I wouldn't try it with a forklift. You need a crane and a good operator.

It ain't worth getting somebody hurt or even killed is my philosophy. What kind of forklift reaches 4 stories? It is one thing to boom material up 40 feet, but it is totally different to reach out in front of you maybe 20 feet and lift a heavy wall off the deck.
 
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