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Love me some Concrete
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok guys,

I bid a patio and of course the house side is a wet screed. But now the customer wants it colored and stamped, additional money of course but I had originally bid to do it in 2 pours. So here's my questions:

1. How noticeble will a form line be down the middle of a slate pattern stamp on a Soapstone color (Butterfield). I know I have to cut it but there is no change in pattern if cut and caulked.

2. I am damn nervous about the color match and also trying to match the pattern. Can this be done?

I do not know if I have the skills to pour it in 1 shot, it would be a 18' screed board and no way do I have the skills on the Screed Demon yet for it, seen it done and tried it but there is no room for error. A 18' 2 x6 for a screed is a som'***** to pull too!

Oh, I failed to meantion that it is not square, the edges will be a slight wave pattern, so forming will be fun especially because 2 radius are darn tight.
 

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CCC
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Ok guys,

I bid a patio and of course the house side is a wet screed. But now the customer wants it colored and stamped, additional money of course but I had originally bid to do it in 2 pours. So here's my questions:

1. How noticeble will a form line be down the middle of a slate pattern stamp on a Soapstone color (Butterfield). I know I have to cut it but there is no change in pattern if cut and caulked.

2. I am damn nervous about the color match and also trying to match the pattern. Can this be done?

I do not know if I have the skills to pour it in 1 shot, it would be a 18' screed board and no way do I have the skills on the Screed Demon yet for it, seen it done and tried it but there is no room for error. A 18' 2 x6 for a screed is a som'***** to pull too!

Oh, I failed to meantion that it is not square, the edges will be a slight wave pattern, so forming will be fun especially because 2 radius are darn tight.
How big is it? You know, you can always get someone else to help you pull the board? If I was you I would pour it all in one shot and just go buy or rent another slate stamps. Those are fairly cheap and you can always add to your production in the future as well as cut down the labor and time needed to make two pours. And yes, the cold joint would be pretty noticeable unless you get a carpet edger and make it look like a saw cut.
 

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Line up a couple extra hands, maybe throw in a shot of retarder.

Can you set a pipe and pull it in two passes?
 

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Love me some Concrete
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
How big is it? You know, you can always get someone else to help you pull the board? If I was you I would pour it all in one shot and just go buy or rent another slate stamps. Those are fairly cheap and you can always add to your production in the future as well as cut down the labor and time needed to make two pours. And yes, the cold joint would be pretty noticeable unless you get a carpet edger and make it look like a saw cut.
Didn't think about adding someone else to board, maybe I can throw 1 in the middle. It's a 24 x 24, which I know is small for a lot of guys but for a stamp it's a bigger 1 for us.

I have done the pipe screed with less than great results!
 

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Gen. Contractor
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Don't you have the wire things that wrap around a stake and hold a 2x4 for a center screed? And dude- you need to get an aluminum screed! Get a helper to run the hard set side of the screed and you run the wet- set a center and run two passes.
 

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Seamless Slate?

Very doable, but get extra help.

Honestly if I was set on doing it in two pours I would overform the first one by a few inches and saw cut the edge clean, then when you butt up to it you can run the saw on the new edge also and it will look just like a matching cut with the rest of the pad.

Boards over 14' for anything other than wet pads are 3 man boards in my opinion, and that is a pretty big chunk to hand screed anyway, especially in the summer.
 

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Love me some Concrete
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Seamless Slate?

Very doable, but get extra help.

Honestly if I was set on doing it in two pours I would overform the first one by a few inches and saw cut the edge clean, then when you butt up to it you can run the saw on the new edge also and it will look just like a matching cut with the rest of the pad.

Boards over 14' for anything other than wet pads are 3 man boards in my opinion, and that is a pretty big chunk to hand screed anyway, especially in the summer.
I thought about a cut to match but did not think about over forming, I might do that, thanks.

I have a aluminum 12' screed board and hate it, too smooth to work concrete down well IMO
 

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I thought about a cut to match but did not think about over forming, I might do that, thanks.

I have a aluminum 12' screed board and hate it, too smooth to work concrete down well IMO
Curious, are you a tipper or a digger on the board?

I was taught to, and always do, tip the board back when screeding, and we always saw it, closes it up really nice.

Some guys though will hold that thing at 90 degrees and just swipe digging with the front edge. That always seems to leave to top torn to hell and once you hit it with the bull float you actually lose the grade you had.
 

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Love me some Concrete
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I am a saw and tipper, the wood screed seems to do a better job of setting the top and closes it up the best IMO. I agree on the dragging, it does leave the top chewed up and then you have to use the float to actually try and close the gaps, doesn't usually work right. Now if I am doing a wet screed, sometimes you have to just drag but only when needed.

It is like trying to use the mag trowel to set the edges, my wood float does a much better job and then finish it with mag trowel.
 

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You are right to be wary of color when doing two pours. How did it turn out? Get the help and do one if possible to avoid color issues. As one suggested, get more stamps. Small investment. Just go online an google concrete stamps and you can easily build your stock. They are easily found on Ebay from contractor source if you are price conscience. Another method that often works when you simply cannot do in one pour is to use a decorative border stamp to cut the pattern in half. Something like an 8" slate tile stamp. You eliminate the need to match up the pattern and it gives 8-10 inches of separation that will go along way to masking "slight" color hue differences.
 
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