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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I stained and sealed some window trim and I need it a little darker. Can I put a second coat of sealer up and then a coat of brown wax,To darken its overall appearance a bit?
 

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I'm not sure what you mean by 'brown wax' but putting any wax on a stained/painted surface is only going to complicate maintenance in the future.

Toning is the way to go for darkening an already sealed surface. In your case, something like Pollyshades would probably be easiest.
 

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I owned a custom cabinet shop for 14 years and was a pretty good custom finsher.Why would you want to put wax of any kind on anything to be stained ?Darker or otherwise?If you want the finish darker why would you need another coat of sealer before tinting it darker?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So it was a minwax stain I let it dry overnight. Then I put a coat of about 30% stain mixed with 70% poly. It darkened it up a bit so tomorrow ill do 100% poly . Then I was thinking a dark wax. Im not to worried about cloudiness, more worried about color. The previous stain was definitely a rub on top coat stain so cloudiness is not a issue. Although the factory windows where definetly a spray oil. I ****ed up
 

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Minwax is a pigmented stain. Let it stand overnight undisturbed. Using a flat stick scrape the bottom of the can and get the sludge (that's what I call it) I'm assuming it's a dark stain so it will settle out overnight.

Mix it with the poly and apply.

Your other alternative is to sand back down to bare wood and not jump the gun with the poly until you're sure you got the color correct. Easier to replace the moldings then to sand

ALWAYS provide a sample that is finished and get it signed off
 

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Nothing will adhear to it.
Except shellac.

I'm not a fan of putting wax on either, but here's a trick from my sordid past. I would use Liquid Gold as a solvent on a cloth, get a little shoe polish of the right color on it (or use 2 different ones), flip it inside out so the wax would just bleed through somewhat controlably, then go over the piece I was dealing with. Similar to using Old English on furniture, but you can do color matching to an extent.
 

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So it was a minwax stain I let it dry overnight. Then I put a coat of about 30% stain mixed with 70% poly. It darkened it up a bit so tomorrow ill do 100% poly . Then I was thinking a dark wax. Im not to worried about cloudiness, more worried about color. The previous stain was definitely a rub on top coat stain so cloudiness is not a issue. Although the factory windows where definetly a spray oil. I ****ed up

Hit and miss is a risky way to go. I'm assuming you're brushing this. Usually you have to scuff sand the coat to get the next one to adhere well. You can wet scuff sand using the tinted poly to get you where you want to be, but you have to wipe to see what you have - it will mud up and look pretty bad until it's wiped. It's very technique sensitive, and it works best with higher tinting levels because you're going to wipe most of the product off. The more you scuff, the darker you get. I'm dubious this will be practical on window profiles.
 
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