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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Looks like it’s murder on your hands too :laughing: Define “lay it on thick”. How thick is too thick?
This was 4" of closed cell, I'm assuming the installer layed it on thick instead of doing half inch lifts and letting the heat dissipate...really did a number on this wire.
 

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Head Grunt
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Lots of opinions out there but i am not fond of the spray foam myself. I too have seen melted wire sheathing, a nightmare to fish through, very expensive and i have seen a couple homes around here that were so tightly sealed that fresh air ventilation needed to be installed so the home could breathe. It does have many benefits but not enough to convince me into using it. IMO window technology is what needs to be worked on for better insulating and heat loss.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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I'd rather have a tight home with an HRV/ERV than a leaky home.
That's everyone's kneejerk thought, and where the codes are inevitably headed. However, I have a problem with the idea of a dwelling that requires a 24/7 artificial means of ventilation. Where's the energy savings in that? How are you and your house going to stay healthy through an extended power outage?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Didn't know it could get that hot.
This was sprayed in the summer when it was already really hot compounding the issue. What you see there is a short on every conductor.

I don't have a problem with spray foam, but when you delete the conduit from the contract and decided to spray over wires, at least spray in a fashion that you don't destroy them.
 

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stacker of sticks
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Tinstaafl said:
That's everyone's kneejerk thought, and where the codes are inevitably headed. However, I have a problem with the idea of a dwelling that requires a 24/7 artificial means of ventilation. Where's the energy savings in that? How are you and your house going to stay healthy through an extended power outage?
Crack a window
 

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That's everyone's kneejerk thought, and where the codes are inevitably headed. However, I have a problem with the idea of a dwelling that requires a 24/7 artificial means of ventilation. Where's the energy savings in that? How are you and your house going to stay healthy through an extended power outage?
HRVs don't really cost that much to run. Probably less than than having a real leaky house. I'd rather have a filtered source of fresh air and a means to exhaust stale air than rely on poor building details to let air leak in and out of my house uncontrolled.

Power outages? Like already said, open in window. If the power outage is more than a week, you have much bigger issues than fresh air. I have a backup generator setup and a 1k gallon propane tank so I'm not super worried about it.

While energy savings are a big part of it, they aren't everything. You have to live there too, not just pay the bills. Comfort and health is a big part of it and a tight, mechanically vented house will blow the doors off a leaky house in that aspect.
 

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I just dont understand how anyone lasted a year in those crappy leaky farmhouses back in the day. That fresh air leaking in was just so dang unhealthy its a wonder anyone survived!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have an old leaky house with a brand new high efficiency gas furnace, it's so cheap to heat I don't think I'll bother adding insulation.
 

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It's not a discussion when a person won't accept any ideas but their own. Too many questionable practices in the trades were adopted because everyone went along with it, ignoring anyone that questioned those practices.
 

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It's not a discussion when a person won't accept any ideas but their own. Too many questionable practices in the trades were adopted because everyone went along with it, ignoring anyone that questioned those practices.
Where are you getting that I won't accept any views but my own? Because I expressed my views and you don't agree with them?

Too many questionable practices have continued because everyone went along with them because "that's how we've always done it" too.
 

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Sean
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Didn't know it could get that hot.
Oh yeah, some of them have burnt down houses due to not paying attention to the lift specs from the manufacturers

As for trying to compare an old farmhouse to a modern house - no worries just rip out the AC units, go back to chopping 5 cords or more of wood & you are good to go.

As for costs, they vary but as I know people paying over $700 a month to heat while most people in newer homes are around $200 :whistling
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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As for trying to compare an old farmhouse to a modern house - no worries just rip out the AC units, go back to chopping 5 cords or more of wood & you are good to go.

As for costs, they vary but as I know people paying over $700 a month to heat while most people in newer homes are around $200 :whistling
If you chop your own wood, it won't cost $700 a month. :jester:

On a more serious note, the monthly cost of heating doesn't address the extra cost associated with super-green building that may or may not pay for itself over the expected tenancy--which most likely is going to be far less than a lot of the 150 year old leaky houses standing today.
 
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