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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm spraying this dye stain on maple. Piss coat first then light 320 sanding. I don5 know why but I'm getting these spots everywhere on 5he sides.

What am I doing wrong.. I am spraying two light mist coats of dye. Air is at minimum and fluid knob on hvlp is close to minimum. Wood Book Material property Hardwood Leather
 

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My thoughts exactly
I would have burned those doors by now :sad:



What exactly is this "dye stain" ? You added dye to what?
 

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Maple can be real tough to stain. Can be very blotchy. Need to pay attention to the grains of the wood. Straight grains stain easier.
 

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First, is the sanding job fresh.

2nd, how cold is it where you are spraying? 65F should be a minimum. 72F is better.

If spray stain or toner is too cold you can get mottling of the stain.

Put some laq thinner on a cloth and rub it around, should even it up. If it's water base, don't do that.
 

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Finish Carpenter
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His is using trans tint in water on top of a wash coat of Acrylic Lacquer (Em6000).

Leo is spot on with the temp thing too, when you get below 70 degrees you need to be much better with the gun to get waterborne to lay out right (and allow more time in between coats) 72-75 has been ideal for me.

I had that spotting happen to me once, it was from spraying dye (transtint in water), and spraying it too heavy, causing it to pool. That was on maple too.

Water has a higher surface tension then lacquer thinner or alcohol and I THINK that is what was causing it. I have no information to back that up besides my own thoughts.
By spraying too heavy, the water pulled together and started to form droplets on the sealed surface.

If you didn't add any binder (finish) to your dye stain and you have not shot any finish over it, you can still do what Leo said...but try alcohol as the Lacquer thinner will destroy the fresh (and cured, it will just do it faster on the fresh) EM6000.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
so here is what i did and it fixed the spots....my original schedule was:

I am diluting transtint with DNA, not water.

But here's what i did to fix the situation. instead of sanding the washcoat, i just left it dry and then spay the stain right on it. i believe that when i sanded 320 the washcoat, i was sanding off the washcoat making it pointless..i dont know if this theory is correct but i did notice a more even finish by not sanding the washcoat and go directly to spray stain
 

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Finish Carpenter
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so here is what i did and it fixed the spots....my original schedule was:

I am diluting transtint with DNA, not water.

But here's what i did to fix the situation. instead of sanding the washcoat, i just left it dry and then spay the stain right on it. i believe that when i sanded 320 the washcoat, i was sanding off the washcoat making it pointless..i dont know if this theory is correct but i did notice a more even finish by not sanding the washcoat and go directly to spray stain
I could have swore I saw a post with your dye to water ratio. Guess I was wrong.
 
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