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Can I remove this wall?

  • Yes, it is not load bearing and you should be able to remove it.

    Votes: 1 20.0%
  • NO! It's load bearing, do not remove it.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Hard to make a decision based on the info provided.

    Votes: 4 80.0%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Folks,

I've been following threads about various discussions regarding load bearing walls. There is a section of wall in a split entry home I recently purchased that I would like to remove. Refer to my profile photo for a picture of it (I've also attached a picture which I have wrote on to make it more clear). I want to remove it to make the space of the home feel larger. (It is a pic looking from the living room, into the dining room. The kitchen is only 6'x10' and is hidden behind the wall in question).

The home inspector has told me the roof is a truss system. The distance the trusses span is around 22' (dimensions of the home are around 22'x40', it is a traditional split entry home).

Based on knowing it is a truss system, the span which the trusses cover, and the fact that (as shown in the photo) there is no header for about an 8' wide section of the opening into the dining room, do you think the wall blocking the view of the kitchen could be removed without any concerns about it being load bearing?

Please let me know if you have any more questions, I will try to answer as best as I can but I do not get the keys for a few more weeks and I'm trying to properly plan out all of my renovations so they are complete before we actually move in.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There is no “dropped” beam in there. Doesn’t mean there is no “flush” beam. The fact that they are trusses means nothing.
So the answer is if there is no "flush" beam, I am fine. However, if there is a flush beam I am S.O.L. and need to rethink my approach?
 

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There is no “dropped” beam in there. Doesn’t mean there is no “flush” beam. The fact that they are trusses means nothing.
Recessed beam in the middle of trusses?

Go poke your head in the attic and see what's there...but I'm voting not load bearing.
 

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Not likely but I don’t want him tearing that wall out on a “possible maybe”. The trusses could be designed to have the webs point load on that wall as well. There’s more to it than just whether there’s a beam or not.

Get an engineer or take Inner’s word for it! Telling him to stick his head in the attic when he doesn’t know what he’s looking for is sound advice to be sure. :no:
 

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Get a picture of the truss system above that wall. It's very unlikely that it is loadbearing but could be. Heck the inspector might be completely wrong too.
 

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Trusses can be tricky.
Depending on the design they could be clear span or not.

When I put my house up all my trusses were designed for clear span.
With the exception that I have the original truss designs, I don't know how you could verify that. There is nothing on the truss itself.
 

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The Ultimate Wire Hider
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There is no “dropped” beam in there. Doesn’t mean there is no “flush” beam.
I agree. Also when you take out walls near the center of the house you will sometimes discover that the enclosed wall is really a plenum. What you thought would be a great weekend project ends up turning into am R&R job/nightmare.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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There is no way you'll get a truly valid conclusion from "some guys on the internet". Do yourself a favor and have a qualified contractor or engineer look at the situation in person.

Thread closed.
 
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