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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Door guys:
What can I expect on this situation (tomorrow), if anything?

I needed to replace a steel entry door for a condo and didn't know the brand. So I took the specs to my yard to order it custom, including hinge mortice location, door height, bore placements, etc. . 3 0", 79 1/8 height, etc.

I picked up my door last week, took it home, painted it a couple coats, then went to install it today. First, the hinge mortices weren't even close. With the wood edge, I was able to fix that with the Multitool. Next, went to hang it and it's too tight/tall by a hair (79 1/4 vs. 79 1/8). I didn't have my block plane with me (for the top jamb), but I'm like WTF? So I tried to shave the top jamb with the multitool and ended up getting the door stuck and cutting my hand as I pried it out. %$%#$%$!

Anyway, is it basically on me for not taking out my tape to double-check everything when I picked it up? Or do I have somewhat of a legitimate beef? Thanks.
 

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I'd take it back and throw it in the suppliers parking lot.

I had something similar happen to me through, I ordered 2 special order doors, 1 32" and the other 36". We had them in the trailer for 2 weeks and I went to put them in and they sent me 2 32" doors. So took 1 back and I'm still waiting for the correct one.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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Can't you cut the door to fit with a circular saw and a straight edge?
Then what's the point of special-ordering? One usually does so in order to avoid such stuff.

Mark, I gotta say that yes, you should have checked all the measurements as soon as you received the door, before "butchering" it. Now that you've painted it and chewed on it a bit, it's hard to make a good case for sending it back and getting one made right at no extra cost. Hard knocks suck, but they do educate.

Just curious, but many entry door thresholds are adjustable. Could you have cranked that one down to make the door fit?
 

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I think I got you all beat;

https://picasaweb.google.com/tbadernwi/ClevelandRocks

Fabricated the doors in the link to architects specs. Get the call on Monday night asking if I can fabricate them. Small caveat, they have to be installed by noon on Friday (yes the same week Friday)...............................in Cleveland. About 300 miles east of my location. Told them no problem.

Packed ready to leave to install, call to make final arrangements. Project manager for the first time gives me the opening size.............new slightly larger problem- spec was 26" x 80" finished opening size 60 x 78. Order should have been 2/6 x 6/6 to adjust the height for the speced track.

If you took the time to go through the Picasa Album I linked, you'll see I got them to fit.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Can't you cut the door to fit with a circular saw and a straight edge?
It's a metal-clad door with sweep. No cuts, except for the mortice edge. It ticks me off because we went through the specific dimensions when I ordered it, and they even requested a copy of my notes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Then what's the point of special-ordering? One usually does so in order to avoid such stuff.

Mark, I gotta say that yes, you should have checked all the measurements as soon as you received the door, before "butchering" it. Now that you've painted it and chewed on it a bit, it's hard to make a good case for sending it back and getting one made right at no extra cost. Hard knocks suck, but they do educate.

Just curious, but many entry door thresholds are adjustable. Could you have cranked that one down to make the door fit?
No adjustments to the threshold can be made. It's embedded in concrete, like they do when they build these multi-unit things. It's already too low, too. With the sweep on the new door, there won't be room for a floormat. (or do they call that thing a "door bottom" - I forget.)

I will be hand-planing the jamb tomorrow.
 

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I have cut the bottoms of steel doors with my track saw. The steel is not that thick. Had to cut the grooves in the bottom spacer to reinstall the sweep.

Tom
 

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The last four different fire rated slabs I ordered from Western Building Products were all wrong. They have a spec sheet to fill out and they can't follow it. The one I'm in the middle of now I sent back twice. We'll see if they can get it right the third time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
To add insult to this, I actually painted the darned thing THREE times before delivery. I needed to match the complex's existing colors, but they didn't know what paint it was. So I "eyeballed" it with my tiny color chart (very dark green) and missed it by a mile...twice.

Right now it's close enough, [email protected]
 

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Then what's the point of special-ordering? One usually does so in order to avoid such stuff.

Mark, I gotta say that yes, you should have checked all the measurements as soon as you received the door, before "butchering" it. Now that you've painted it and chewed on it a bit, it's hard to make a good case for sending it back and getting one made right at no extra cost. Hard knocks suck, but they do educate.

Just curious, but many entry door thresholds are adjustable. Could you have cranked that one down to make the door fit?
I agree that is the point of special ordering, but at this point he has no choice but to cut the door, It sounds like a wooden jamb so its probably a wooden door?

It is way faster and cost effective to cut the door down, I wouldnt touch the jamb, and if you want to plane anything get a 3 1/2" planer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Metal-clad door. I think it's easier to gain the 1/32 to 1 /16" clearance that I need in the top jamb.

...I wish I had just bought the Jeld-Wen slab from HD to begin with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I've never had luck replacing a steel door as a slab. Stinks but its usually less headache to put a prehung in.[/QUOTE

This set-up had a full light panel adjacent to the door. And with the concrete embedding, color matching, and tile right up to the theshold, I opted for the quicker method of replacing the door...which is why I'm still not done with it.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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I've never had luck replacing a steel door as a slab. Stinks but its usually less headache to put a prehung in.
Contrarywise, I find it much less of a headache to replace a slab than the whole magilla. Steel-clad doors are cuttable without much more effort than wooden ones.
 

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If the sweep functions well, can you trim the top of the door to clear the jamb? Belt sander maybe? The heat my screw up the paint.

If the bottom is real close you may be able to get a lower profile sweep.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Contrarywise, I find it much less of a headache to replace a slab than the whole magilla. Steel-clad doors are cuttable without much more effort than wooden ones.
So if you trim it, what do you do about the edge? How nice does it cut? Any special blade?
 

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80 grit will take it down in very little time. You'll be surprised how thin the metal is. I was not kidding when I said I cut them with my TS55 track saw, I use the 48 tooth blade. As Tinsfaafl said they cut like a wood door.

The edge you can file down so it is not sharp. The sweep will cover the edge.

The bottom and top spreaders are the same as the hinge and knob sides, wood.

Tom
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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So if you trim it, what do you do about the edge? How nice does it cut? Any special blade?
Similar to cutting coil stock; just score it with a utility knife a few times, then bend and break the metal. Once that's done, hit the wood with your saw.

It's intimidating the first time or two, but not really that big a deal. :thumbsup:
 
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