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i have a client that wants to sound proof his bedroom i will use quiet rock product is a kind of drywall i do not know how to estimate this, does any one have an idea.
 

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I use a variety of products for home theater. How quiet does he want it? What frequency levels? Need to know trains, planes, autos or rock bands. All spectrums are different.
 

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Sound batt insulation in the walls...is it an engineered sound transmission job?
 

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Sound Proofing

Most of your sound leakage is going to be bass frequency. The best sound proofing method involves the usage of air space between walls. i would make sure the existing walls are insolated ,then ad an R.C chennel.On top of the R.C add your Quiet Wall board. i've used this method with great success. you will also need to consider the floor and roof,The same can be done on the ceiling. For the floor you'll have to be creative. Is it a slab or joist system?
As far as bidding...that depends on how fast you are. The Quiet Rock is heavy and is also messy being that you have to cut it with a skill saw. So keep this in mind while calcing out your hrs.
 

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To truly deaden all freqs. you will need to add 10 - 14" of expensive insulation. I have worked with BOSE on this to eliminate machinery room noise from the living quarters of high-end yachts. You may want to investigate what is available to the average yacht owner. Lower freq's are common with diesels and lead shielding with different density foams are the common 'cheap' way out.
 

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I recently read this approach to deadening the sound.

2x6 top and sill plate. 2x4 studs, at least 1' o.c. staggered. Then weave the insulation horizontally through the studs. Followed up by whatever wall board you choose. Don't know how well it works, just read it in my sound literature.

Bob
 

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as i understand it, isolating noise is directly related to your ability to dampen the vibration that transfers it.

structural integrity plays a role here. we haven't heard how the home is built but, for example, an older hardwood floor that has gotten creeky and loose over the years will have enough play in it to freely transfer vibrations associated with noise.

make sure all your subfloors, joist, wall surfaces, rafters, everything are tight. use heavy floor covers and have your home owner consider heavy wall furnishings and drapes.

i'll keep saying it, but automotive technologies can be of some use to you here. visit quietcar.com for products that will help you insulate small, hard to reach or stangely shaped areas such as the inside of electrical boxes, hvac ducts etc. etc.....

if you look at most condo or apartments being built today, they use wall structures seperating the units that do not touch each other. that should tell you something.

keep us informed of your progress! good luck!
 
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