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Level 27 Contractor
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Discussion Starter #1
I quoted a basement the other day where the clients want to sound proof their walls. Its an attached home and they say the noise transfers right through the party wall.

I suggested doing roxul sound insulation with resilient channel. I quoted them quiet rock as well, but at about 50-60$ dollars a sheet its out their its a bit high for their liking.



I used a product called sonopan before which is also a soundproofing material. Just curious as to what other systems are out there that might work better and what their costs might be.


http://www.sonopan.com/EN/home.asp





The basement itself is about 10' X 21' roughly 7 feet high. Dont know if that makes a difference or not.
 

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Have you done any exploration yet to see whats there? how old are these units?I once worked on a co-op complex that was built in 50's or 60's that had ZERO insulation between units and floors with 1/2 rock.

Limiting the vibrations is your main concern. screwing 1x2's perpendicular to your resilient channel will help reduce vibrations, roxul and 2 layers 5/8 will also help
 

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Ive used a system from greenglue.com

2x4 framing with existing layer of 1/2" drywall. I then attached the special clips with hat channels then attached a layer of 5/8ths drywall.Then you liberally apply the special green glue in between an additional layer of 5/8th drywall. Caulk perimeter and switch/outlet boxes. Works pretty well. it was used to reduce road noise. I can give a full review later as we are changing the windows and doors to sound proofed ones.
 

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quiet rock is amazing stuff. Honestly for a shared wall, what are you talking - 7-8 sheets max? That's not in their budget? That stuff is an easy sell for me now for soundproofing.

The only downside is the quietseal VOC's :sick: ;-)
 

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does someone have a link or can tell me how to install resilient channel?

I remember reading that the channels are installed upside down and the sheetrock attached to them "hangs" with an airspace created by the channel being pulled out a bit. As I recall, the bottom row is installed with the screws on the top.
 

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does someone have a link or can tell me how to install resilient channel?

I remember reading that the channels are installed upside down and the sheetrock attached to them "hangs" with an airspace created by the channel being pulled out a bit. As I recall, the bottom row is installed with the screws on the top.
RC-1 resilient Channel should be installed at right angles to the joists or trusses 16” OC, when the joists or trusses are 24” on center. Though you can install the RC-1 24" OC when the joists/trusses are 16" OC, I always just install 16" OC regardless.

You wanna start applying the resilient channel with the center a maximum of 6” from the wall. On ending at the other side stop the last course of resilient channel a maximum of 6” from the wall. When using RC-1 on the ceiling have the open side all going the same direction. On ending at the other side stop the last course of resilient channel a maximum of 6” from the wall, same as the other side. You may wind up with the last row being less than 16" or 24" OC, whatever your using. Stop the resilient channel at least 1” from the adjacent wall.

Use 1 1/4 coarse thread for wood studs. For steel joists or trusses 3/8” Type S pan head screws should be used. Don't ever use nails. To fasten the gyp to the resilient channel use 1” Type S Buglehead screws every 12”-16". Screws should not come in contact with the stud, joist or truss.

Don't ever screw more than 2 layers of 5/8" to your RC-1.

This is how to install it on the ceiling. Wall installation is pretty much the same, but there are some differences.
 

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Ciaos mitigator
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you can use Z channel too. just make sure nothing is fastened to the party wall and you should be fine. leave the new wall an inch off the party wall, then insulate it behind the studs and between with roxul type insulation. then 5/8" drywall should be fine.

remember that sound travels though materials just like heat. thermal breaks work for keeping sound out also.
 

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What is the material the existing party wall is made from? Is it concrete or frame? Be sure you keep in mind that you'll need to maintain the fire rating between units.

For walls the more layers the better (and if varying materials) This is because the typical sound between walls is audible types such as people talking, loud music, etc....whereas hat channel is used more commonly on the ceilings because not only do you have audible noise, you also have vibrational contact type sounds... people walking on wood floors, dropping of objects, etc hence the need to separate the layers and essentially break the contact apart.(hat channel)

Hope that made sense....

If they're on a budget, go with a good layer of sound batt (not the insulation) abduction 2 layers of 5/8" gyp.(type x if maintaining fire rating) and be sure to alternate seems and dont forget to foam up any cracks void,etc.

Sorry for all the rambling...:p
 

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Ive used a system from greenglue.com

2x4 framing with existing layer of 1/2" drywall. I then attached the special clips with hat channels then attached a layer of 5/8ths drywall.Then you liberally apply the special green glue in between an additional layer of 5/8th drywall. Caulk perimeter and switch/outlet boxes. Works pretty well. it was used to reduce road noise. I can give a full review later as we are changing the windows and doors to sound proofed ones.
This is the best suggestion so far, but quiet rock is pretty darn good aswell. :thumbsup: I've played with lots of different sound proofing materials. In the end this is going to cost you as much as quiet rock.

Seal all your electrical boxes as best possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for all the great suggestions guys! The party wall itself is block. Then there is what appears to be a typical 2x4 framed wall in front of it with drywall.

What I dont know is if I use quietrock, do I use it with the resilient channel still? Is it fire rated or do I still need to adhere a secondary layer?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Wouldn't the block wall be fire rated?
yeah youre, right, I need to double check on the codes in ontario. The Block wall is the main party. The stud framing is just to finish the basement its not the main seperating wall. so can it be just 1/2 inch then?
 

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The block should cover you on the rating, but it will depend on the listed wall assembly originally spec'd when built. Typical in the states is a 2-hour separation on a townhome style where its fee simple (you own house and land its on) In the past I've used U905 (I think that's the number) UL listing which only requires class D CMU to make 2 hours.
 

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The Ultimate Wire Hider
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However you decide to do it, the important thing is to have that gap of air space between the existing wall and the new material. Sound travels more readily through the things that are connected to each other than those which are not.

When sound hits a wall, most of the sound is reflected back but some of it travels through the wall and then it dissipates in the air. For instance, in a regular house where two bedrooms are constructed side by side separated with a standard wall framed up with 2x4's and 1/2 drywall on both sides, the sound is reduced in stages as it dissipates. The sound hits the first sheet of drywall, then it dissipates in the 3½" gap and hits the second sheet of drywall and then it dissipates again into the adjacent room. But what also happens is that in the parts of the drywall that is actually screwed down to the studs, the sound is transferred through the wood and it is dissipating into the adjacent room at the first stage level... thus making it possible to hear any sounds above a whisper.
 
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When sound hits a wall, most of the sound is reflected back but some of it travels through the wall and then it dissipates in the air. For instance, in a regular house where two bedrooms are constructed side by side separated with a standard wall framed up with 2x4's and 1/2 drywall on both sides, the sound is reduced in stages as it dissipates. The sound hits the first sheet of drywall, then it dissipates in the 3½" gap and hits the second sheet of drywall and then it dissipates again into the adjacent room. But what also happens is that in the parts of the drywall that is actually screwed down to the studs, the sound is transferred through the wood and it is dissipating into the adjacent room at the first stage level... thus making it possible to hear any sounds above a whisper.
Bang on, decoupling is the foundation of "sound proofing" I hate that term as it should be sound reducing.;)
 
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