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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all, I have built a two car garage at the rear of my property that I would like to start using for occasional wood and car work.
Any ideas on sound proofing or at least making it as quite as I can for the neighbors sake.
I tried doing some searches here with little luck, so you can just send me to links if you know of previous posts on the subject of shop noise reduction.
Thanks.
 

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Offset studs that do not touch the outside wall, insulate and cover in your choice of finishes. Remove the vibrations to the exterior walls and remove the sound.
 

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Offset studs that do not touch the outside wall, insulate and cover in your choice of finishes. Remove the vibrations to the exterior walls and remove the sound.
That and hat channel prior to wall board.

No windows

Insulated roll up door.

A really good stereo system :laughing:
 

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Res channel aka z-channel great stuff !:thumbsup:
 

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The absolute biggest leak will be that garage door. It is very light (no mass) and very poorly sealed. In 10 years I have never seen a successful soundproofing job that included an overhead or barn door o track. If you can't deal with the door, then you'd really be wasting money on the walls.

Some other good points were brought up that I think should be addressed:

Will foam work? No, not much. The foam is far too tight and closed up for sound waves to interract.

Will mineral wool and mineral fiber, cellulose work as well as fiberglass? Yes, but they won't work any better. Medium density is all that is required. If you pack it, the insulation will conduct vibration. R19 in ceilings, R13 in walls.

Regarding "offset studs": I assume this means installing a completely separate stud wall, maybe 1" away from the existing wall. That would decouple the new wall from the old wall, and this is absolutely the most efficient means to decouple.

Regarding adding metal channel to the decoupled wall: This will provide zero additional sound isolation. The channels decouple, but that wall would already be decoupled. Decoupling with the framing is much more effective than decoupling with channel.

Regarding Hat Channel vs. Resilient Channel (RC-1): Resilient Channel has no spec from the SSMA. Every manufacturer out there is free to make Resilient Channel any way they like. The system operates if it can move like a spring. The drywall moves in and out (or up and sown on ceilings) like a piston. If the channel is too flimsy, the drywall sags and there's no spring. If the channel is too stiff, there's no spring. If you shoot a screw through the drywall into the original stud or joist, there's no spring. According to Dietrich, 85% of installs are compromized in some way. Short circuited, not enough weight, too much weight. Resilient channel is very much a wild card, and this is why few acoustical designers continue to spec it. Doo a Google search unfer "resilient channel lawsuit" and see what you find. This is far and away the #1 most litigated sound isolation product / technique.
 

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Best to do what the audio pros do and use the special green isolating caulk (not cheap by Audio Alloy's - Green Glue) and a second sheet of drywall. The green stuff minimizes vibration transmission from the inside sheetrock to the outer layer and works great for keeping the sound of a home theater inside the room of a house. There are rubber mount systems but they are a lot more expensive. Double pane windows are also important and help a lot with sound transmission.

The green glue is what is known as a "visco-elastic sound dampening compound" and comes in quart tube sizes. You will get the best results for the least additional cost with this approach. Need to follow the directions for attaching the sheetrock using this compound.
 

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Green Glue, manufactured by the Green Glue Company, (now part of Saint Gobain) is a great added step. But less effective if there aren't additional isolation steps taken. Decoupled framing, absorption, mass and damping are the 4 things you should shoot for
 

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I agree that there are other factors to consider but it depends upon the location of the "noise" source and the amount of db reduction desired. People may want 40db reduction but only have a budget for 10db and that may be all the is really required. It is not a case of a single approach being used for all situations and it needs to be scaled to the individual's budget.

For a $500,000 home theater like that of former 49er Jerry Rice a different approach makes sense than as with this individual who simply wishes to minimize the outbound noise from the use of shop tools. In many cases adding sound dampening to the inside of the cabinets will do a great deal to reduce the ambient noise inside the shop as well as outside and kill two birds with one stone.

Nothing is more acoustically live than a shop with a hard floor, sheetrock ceilings and walls. Anything that softens the surfaces will reduce the reflected noise from tools which also can make a big difference, but again the overall cost cannot be ignored and there are approaches that can produce a lot of bang for far fewer bucks than others while reducing noise not entirely but to an acceptable level for the neighbors.
 
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