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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am doing a job where the architect specified Cor-A-Vent for ventilation in front of the soffit framing. We have finished the framing and roofed the project and are about to install the venting, fascia, and gutters. The homeowner, after seeing the Cor-A-Vent before we’ve installed it, expressed concern that the tiny bees we get here (Portland, Oregon) in summer will clog the corrugations of the Cor-A-Vent by putting mud over their egg in the holes.

I have used Cor-A-Vent many times in similar situations, and, quite honestly, I’ve never thought about it. I have seen the vents many times filled with paint, but that’s another issue, and the homeowner will be doing the painting on this job. I cannot really argue with the homeowner here without evidence, and if it were summer, I’d place some test pieces out to see how the bees react. In the past, I’ve seen how tenacious these bees are when I’ve been pulling nails out of a board and the bees will immediately start plugging the holes on the other end the board before you’ve even finished with the board – they are like gnats, but I have a certain affection for them, being sort of fellow house builders.

The architect, of course, never considered this a problem before and is not concerned. We have suggested to him that we substitute perforated strip venting, but the architect does not like the way it will look on this 101 year old house.

Does anyone have any experience with this as an issue? Please look at the attached details and let me know if you have any alternative suggestions.

Thanks.
 

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Lack Of All Trades
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Sounds like a PITA client.

If client doesn't want work done right now -- They just need to say it.

Now, I could be wrong -- but, it seems the client's concerns are unwarranted. H/O doing painting themselves? well, i don't know..

I wouldn't worry to much on this one..

"Mr. Homeowner. Do you want to hire me or what?
That perceived bee problem you brought up is purely speculation."
 

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Looking at the drawing, I was just wondering if that was enough venting. Seems pretty small. Can't remember off hand what the required sq. in. venting is, but you might want to check it out.

Could be a way of getting out of installing those and going to another vent type.
 

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I am doing a job where the architect specified Cor-A-Vent for ventilation in front of the soffit framing. We have finished the framing and roofed the project and are about to install the venting, fascia, and gutters. The homeowner, after seeing the Cor-A-Vent before we’ve installed it, expressed concern that the tiny bees we get here (Portland, Oregon) in summer will clog the corrugations of the Cor-A-Vent by putting mud over their egg in the holes.

I have used Cor-A-Vent many times in similar situations, and, quite honestly, I’ve never thought about it. I have seen the vents many times filled with paint, but that’s another issue, and the homeowner will be doing the painting on this job. I cannot really argue with the homeowner here without evidence, and if it were summer, I’d place some test pieces out to see how the bees react. In the past, I’ve seen how tenacious these bees are when I’ve been pulling nails out of a board and the bees will immediately start plugging the holes on the other end the board before you’ve even finished with the board – they are like gnats, but I have a certain affection for them, being sort of fellow house builders.

The architect, of course, never considered this a problem before and is not concerned. We have suggested to him that we substitute perforated strip venting, but the architect does not like the way it will look on this 101 year old house.

Does anyone have any experience with this as an issue? Please look at the attached details and let me know if you have any alternative suggestions.

Thanks.
In both of those details those vents do nothing because they are blocked off by the sub-fascia, roof sheathing and blocking.

http://www.cor-a-vent.com/s400.cfm
 

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All those guys above are right. It looks like there is not enough venting area, and the vents won't work because of the blocking and backing behind the vents; contact Coravent and ask them about possible issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies.

Darwin: the client is a dream client -- just wants everything done right and is willing to pay for it. Lots of flexibility on their part, so you're willing to bend a little for them. This is also a very well appointed house that is trying to reflect the period materials, so...

Joe: Sorry the detail is not more clear, but there is continuous vent space of at least the equivalent of 1" x 14.5 inches from the roof eaves to the ridges, and at least 3/4" x 22.5" at the 2nd floor eave/wall weep system.

What I was hoping is that there was an equivalent product out there somewhere that had a screened edge or something. I have used just screening before, but it requires continuous backing and is generally a pain in the butt. The Cor-A-Vent is nice because it forms a rather innocuous thin recessed strip. We have worked with this architect before and get great refferals from him -- we're just in that usual situation of balancing homeowner concerns (however irrational!), functionality/practicality, and design intent.

I will contact Cor-A-Vent on monday to see if they have anything to say.
 

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Also, you could spray the vents with raid before installing and tell the client you've looked after his concerns. :laughing:
 

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Could you put a course fabric of some sort over the cora vent before installing it. If the fabric is corse enough to keep from cutting down air flow it might make it so the bees are not able to gain access to the corrigations. You might even get a fabric that will match the painting. I am not totally sure if it will work but it is an idea.
 

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we use cor-a-vent all the time here in right coast, we have bees that build their nests on soffits, and i've not seen or heard of bees being a problem with the cor-a-vent strips. we sometimes have problems with bees getting into exhaust vents that we build into soffits, but dampers normally prevent this.
 
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