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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
IT has been brought to my attention that Canada makes you run snow tires. There are a lot of Canadians on here so I am asking.

Are you running wide or skinny tires, Also what is you preffered snow tire?
Cole
 

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IT has been brought to my attention that Canada makes you run snow tires. There are a lot of Canadians on here so I am asking.

Are you running wide or skinny tires, Also what is you preffered snow tire?
Cole
No you are thinking of the Nazi province of QC, here in ON we don't have to...and it doesn't apply to trucks.

You want pizza cutter tires, as thin as you can get.

Michelin or Nokian Hakkapelittas are top drawer.
 
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I don't have any snow tire reccomendations. I have always run BFG all terrains on my truck. They are great in the snow and pretty much anything else.


Yup inners got it, you want thin tires for the snow!


Dave
 

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Thin studless snow tires. My steep driveway proved they were the best dozens of times a year. FWD cars with blizzaks or similar would zip right up, 4WD trucks with all seasons couldn't even move.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys you are backing up my argument with a friend.

He swears by wide tires in the snow and I love my pizza cutter bfg at ko. Just making sure I wasn't wrong lol :)

Cole
 

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Firestone Winterforce are about as good as you can get, I haven't gotten stuck with them yet. I've even tried to get stuck with them, short of driving into a big snow drift. Cheap, too.

For trucks requiring LT tires, I've used "BFG Commercial T/A Traction" with good results.

Skinny tires are definitely the way to go too. Not for mud though!!
 

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I think wider snow tires/siped MTs are best for deep packed snow that you can't get through to a solid surface. This would be for pretty hardcore type winter offroading, look at those trucks they run in Iceland, those are rocking some 54 x 24s or so... This probably doesn't apply to anyone here though lol

For more tame use, roads, frozen lakes, trails with snow on them you want the skinnies. I run 235/80r17 snow tires on my 3/4 ton in the winter and it does great on unplowed roads with 1' of snow or so. Was also mowing through snowdrifts on the frozen lake pulling my ice shack around... Its about getting the most PSI to the ground to find that traction. It doesn't climb snowbanks as well as my 1/2 ton with 265 snow tires did though...
 

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Lazy Millennial
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I'm running Yokohama i/T GO72 studless snow tires on my Dakota. They're wide, I should have opted for thinner. They are pretty decent but still slip on ice like most studless tires. If you're looking for reviews try tirerack.com It's a shopping site bit they have a decent amount of consumer reviews. I used it to research summer tires for my truck.
 

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Generally, mud tire's don't do well on hard snow/ice. The lugs are too far apart. The closer the lugs, the better. More surface area=better, the reason for skinny tires is to cut through the snow to whatever is underneath. Doesn't help in really deep snow...
 

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Definitely skinny. On some cars, you can move down a rim size and get skinnier snow tires than you can in the stock rim size (as high as 80 series). I plow some in the winter, and in bad storms there can be roads where going down the road with the blade up, the snow is coming up over the raised blade.

Generally, if you want a definitive answer for your area and truck, ask someone how does plowing with the same truck professionally what tire to use. Guys that use a sander have an unfair advantage, and I've seen a couple that keep 1/2 ton of bagged sand in the bed (with a cap over it) all winter.
 

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I've had snow tires in the past and I think they help marginally. Personally I'd rather run really good all-seasons all the time and forgo changing them twice a year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
You mean the gas pedal isn't an on/off switch?...... Mind is blown.
 

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BFG and all the mud style tires with large solid blocks suck on hard pack and ice. I have had just about every aggressive tire and with the exception of full on snow tires these have by far out performed anything else. They are the Goodyear duratracs http://www.goodyear.com/en-US/tires/wrangler-duratrac. found out about them through my jeep community and cant be more pleased with them.

Edit: best part is they are not noisy going down the road like most aggressive tires. I have ran them in snow, mud, sand, ice, and even through the fox river.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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The tire doesn't matter nearly as much as the driver, though. I went a whole winter driving my camaro with my wide summer tires on and no issues. You just have to anticipate.
I consider myself to be a pretty good snow driver, but if you find a Camaro comfy in the snow, you should be wearing a cape. :laughing:
 

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I consider myself to be a pretty good snow driver, but if you find a Camaro comfy in the snow, you should be wearing a cape. :laughing:
He drives with a rye and coke in one hand too!
 
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