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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey there Guys
I need an opinion from people that may be in the same situation as my self. I've lived in this small town of Masset for the past thirty plus years and am now ventureing out on a new career path as I'm soon to retire from a retail job as a Home centre manager, to a self employed handyman/contractor. I've been quite successful in doing small jobs for people here in town evenings and weekends, and now want to tackle projects that are a little larger. I've seldom drawn up contracts in the past but I am now woundering if I'm going slightly bigger are contracts actually needed
Please reply
FurstClass Handyman
 

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I'm a Mac
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Contracts are like life insurance, you have to have it, and hope to hell you never need to use it.

Beyond all the legalities in a contract, a scope defines who does what, a payment schedule lets them and you know when the money is due.

What good reason do you have for not needing a contract?
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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I've seldom drawn up contracts in the past but I am now woundering if I'm going slightly bigger are contracts actually needed
I'll try to get in a halfway serious reply before the goon squad shows up.

The fact that you're retiring implies that you have a secured (though limited) income, so in theory you wouldn't be completely devastated if a client didn't pay you for whatever reason--as long as you are wise enough to get pre-payment for materials (otherwise known as a down payment on the job).

If you do that, you are not [per se] risking paying the client for the opportunity to work; you are only taking the chance of working for free. If you live in a handshake-type community, and are a good judge of character on a first-impression basis, I'd say you're fairly safe in forgoing the hassle.

But if you have any doubts at all, as evidenced by your even asking the question here, you probably should bite the bullet and go ahead and participate in the paper jungle.
 

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Fentoozler
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You dont have to but you should. It sucks when someone pretends theyve never seen you and they owe you 10k.

...on the flip side, leaving no paper trail has it benefits as well.

Oh yeah...accept only CASH.
 

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I also live in a small town. I use a contract for anyone that is not direct referral period. Past customers, if it's more money than I can afford to lose.
 

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We would never consider doing any job without a contract. It actually benefits the homeowner as well since it specifically outlines all work to be done, the exact cost of the job & payment schedule so they are aware when payments are due. Not to mention other things like the need to sign for additional and/or changes BEFORE work can begin, the 3-day right to cancel clause required by CA, etc. It's always best to have everything in writing.
 

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As your jobs get bigger your customers will probably ask for a contract let alone whether or not you think you need one. And yes you will need one.
Good Luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Thanks

Thanks guys
What I've read makes sense, My next little project is a 13' x 14' x 4" concrete pad for a friend of a friend. The price is getting close to what I would think should be the limit with out a contract
Comments appreciated - wish me luck
 

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Carpenter
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Thanks guys
What I've read makes sense, My next little project is a 13' x 14' x 4" concrete pad for a friend of a friend. The price is getting close to what I would think should be the limit with out a contract
Comments appreciated - wish me luck

Good luck sweet pea. See you at dinner.
 

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Thanks guys
What I've read makes sense, My next little project is a 13' x 14' x 4" concrete pad for a friend of a friend. The price is getting close to what I would think should be the limit with out a contract
Comments appreciated - wish me luck

For concrete work - I think you not only need to have a contract - but you need to be armed with all sorts of disclaimers and clauses about the natural flaws that concrete has (such as shrinkage cracks, discoloration, etc).

Concrete is perfect to get out of paying for. It's always easy to find a flaw with it --- get a contract.
 

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WICKED WOODCHUCKER
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For me i will not even do a 500 dollar job without one. For a few reasons. First I want to get paid. Second I like having one so the customer knows exactly whats going to happen. i always have a nice job scope, a discription of all materials needed nad so on. it protects them and you, So to me its a win win.
 

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For concrete work - I think you not only need to have a contract - but you need to be armed with all sorts of disclaimers and clauses about the natural flaws that concrete has (such as shrinkage cracks, discoloration, etc).

Concrete is perfect to get out of paying for. It's always easy to find a flaw with it --- get a contract.

I agree:thumbsup:
 
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