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Any reco's on primer over bare drywall for the future? Any other tips to avoid this problem? Is it worth it to do a quick scrub with a TSP solution, or is that overkill?
I stick to SW Multipurpose or Premium Wall and Wood for nw drywall primer.
As for scrubbing walls with TSP as a routine prep I am not sure, we sand all walls before painting as routine, not sure I want to wash them too, unless the need is obvious.
The reality is how often do you run into it, 1 in 20 rooms?, 1 in 30? So i have taken the attitude that I fix it when i encounter it, and move on. I use the 3M patch and primer in one for these small repairs, but it’s a bugger to sand and still needs primed.
 

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I have never used primer on drywall. Quality paint over drywall and mud without any primer. In my own house I re-did the drywalls in 2 of my basement rooms due to water damage and painted right on top of the new drywalls with Behr paint which most professional painter call it crap paint, this was nearly 18 years ago. The paint still looks as good as day one. No discoloration, no peeling, no nothing. I would like to know from some professional painters why a primer is needed? is it just to reduce the number of layers of paint?
In my opinion new drywall, needs three coats. The first coat will absorb into the drywall unevenly between the drywall paper and drywall joints, this first coat then gives the two coats of paint a more uniform surface so the finish coats will look smooth and even, so it may as well be a primer. You could simply put three coats of paint on a drywall but cost is one factor, and better adhesion of primer is another benefit. However new paint technology changes a lot of rules.

There are many examples of rules being broken and the outcome being ok, your basement perhaps being one and it is great for you. BUT if I was painting a 16’ tall wall with a wall of windows at one end allowing light to stream across that wall, and a stairs in the area so all of the wall is at eye level, I would prime it twice.
 

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I have never used primer on drywall. Quality paint over drywall and mud without any primer. In my own house I re-did the drywalls in 2 of my basement rooms due to water damage and painted right on top of the new drywalls with Behr paint which most professional painter call it crap paint, this was nearly 18 years ago. The paint still looks as good as d

When I started in this business nearly thirty years ago, thirty year painter told me few things, one was: " always prime the walls no matter what, even if the walls look clean" He recommended Ben Moore First Step. (no longer available).
Over the years I would sometimes follow this recommendation, sometimes not.

The best results with the easiest effort always starts with primer.

Primer is less costly than finish paint. So there is a savings there.

Primer allows the paint to spread on the surface better. Makes a labor savings, where you can get away with a single coat.

90% of the times you don't get any surprises on the finish coat.

The end results speak for themselves, no matter what the lighting is.

I find when I prime I never regret it...

Some people love Behr, I've tried it a few times. They sell you less than a gallon. I find it is terrible at leveling.

My personal home, the previous owner painted everything with Glidden and/ or Behr. Some of those colors not only faded but oxidized to a completely different color in some places.

Some one previously mentioned most people develop a system that works. For me Behr isn't part of that system. I won't use it even if my customer provides it. I will have them go purchase off of my account so I don't have to use it. For those people, I find they keep going back purchasing paint for their projects either at BMoore or Sherwin.

Paint costs is far less of a deal in a project as compared to labor. So when you have system that works you're less apt to change it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I agree and I wouldn't skip the primer. Material cost isn't too much of a concern (within reason) as it's such a small part of the project budget that it doesn't matter too much. Besides, the client pays for it.

Thanks for the suggestions in trying to tweak my system. I'm going to try the following going forward:
  • For new drywall, I used PVA not for the price, but because I thought it was the right stuff. It looks like it would be better to use a higher quality multi-purpose primer like S/W Multipurpose or Premium Wall and Wood or Insl-X Prime All.
  • For old walls that I'm saving that are glossy, in poor condition needing a skim coat, or that I'm tying new drywall into, Insl-X Aqua Lock (if I can find it near me) sounds like a good choice.
 

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Part of the problem with buying big box is the product numbers keep changing because the formulations keep changing. You have to do tests just to see how the new formulations perform. This is particularly true for low and mid cost products.

More time, more money, and once you figure it out, the clock is ticking on when stock products get changed again.
 

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Wall and Wood is great on wood, IMHO it sucks on raw drywall.

PrepRite ProBlock is the primer I use. I'm a two primer coat guy....


The HiBuild is also very good primer.

Tom
interestingly, we recently switched to wall and wood after always using multipurpose primer. On some recent jobs I was happy enough with the switch, just on Friday my lead guy said he is not so sure about using wall and wood, he says it flashes through the finish on spot repairs.

The reality is there are so many different primers and all have their place, last time I counted there were 14 different primers available at SW. No wonder it gets confusing.
 

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Literally just had this problem on a job two days ago, but the bubbles weren't little. Turned out to be old glue from a wallpaper removal. The drywallers warned the remodel GC and the homeowners that it might happen, and it did. For the record, the paint held up (Kilz 2 under 2 coats SW SuperPaint), but it was both pronounced and required removal, retexturing, and recoating (we're talking a dozen bubbles ranging from Tootsie Roll size up to baseball size). Kind of makes me wonder why the drywallers didn't slap some oil base directly on the surface prior to skim coat and texture, except I know why: they're drywallers. :cool:
 

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Kilz original is pretty common skimming stripped areas. No water based until it's all sealed and safe.
 

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Agreed. Which is why I wondered why they wouldn't skim under the mud. When we redo texture over wallpaper removals, we seal prime first. 🤷‍♂️
 

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As for scrubbing walls with TSP as a routine prep I am not sure, we sand all walls before painting as routine, not sure I want to wash them too, unless the need is obvious.
Sanding automatically makes it an RRP job if it's a pre-1978 house. Washing doesn't.
 

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One of the big changes I made. No sanding, no picking out or cutting out caulk with a tool.

Cleaning is all the prep I do.
 
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