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Small brick repair - cold weather

2869 Views 14 Replies 5 Participants Last post by  Young mason
I'm not much of a brick or mortar/tuckpointing guy, but need to replace a couple loose bricks on a step and would appreciate some help.

The mortar is a yellow sand type. With damp, cold weather today and tomorrow, (lows of 31), anything special I need to do? Based on some other net surfing, I'm figuring on a 3:1 sand/cement (no lime) mix. Am I on the right track? I've already got the old bricks and mortar chipped out, and some old matching replacements. Thanks much.

Tomorrow we'll have a high of 40, if that helps. After that we head into the 20's.
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Build a small tent and put the heater to it. Got the material up to about 70* do the repair and cover with construction blanket or hay and tarp.
Thanks. (What a headache for two measly bricks.) Did my mix sound ok?
Build a small tent and put the heater to it. Got the material up to about 70* do the repair and cover with construction blanket or hay and tarp.
just buy a bag of type S from home depot, the kind with the sand already in it. Heat it and cover it well.
Does that come in that yellowish tone?
just buy a bag of type S from home depot, the kind with the sand already in it. Heat it and cover it well.
You might have a lime mortar your repairing. After it gets old it looks yellowish.
Lot's of homes have the same mortar. New or old, it's the same yellow mustard color. (same as that color of builder's sand).
You might have a lime mortar your repairing. After it gets old it looks yellowish.
If you can get local sand it may help. I would mix 1:1:3 .
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The colour of the sand comes out with any mortar with age. What happens is the little bit of cement paste on the face of the joint washes out and you see mostly sand (it's 3/4's of the mix). You can add a bit of buff/light ochre to the mix, any decent masonry supply should have some (not homedepot or Lowes). Use it sparingly and some local sand. It will be close when you put it in and will get better in 20 years. A bag of type N and a pial of sand won't cost much over $10 anyway if you want to mix your own. A richer mix (1 cement:2.5 sand) is better for flat work in my opinion cause it's stronger and stickier.

If you get the material warm, and mix with hot/warm water, little to no heat should be required if you cover with an insulated tarp for 2 days after, so long as you don't go below 10F before 48 hrs
How old is the masonry?
Lot's of homes have the same mortar. New or old, it's the same yellow mustard color. (same as that color of builder's sand).
1974 townhomes. I guess that's not new, but still looks clean and tight on many of the homes.
How old is the masonry?
Sounds about right. It takes 10-20 years for the joints to really age depending on how much weather they get
Dragon light dries tanner than Iron clad light. Lafarge dries less grey then iron clad light which is the darkest grey ive used in the light mortar colors.

Mixing with a tan colored sand will help more then the mortar, but the mortar can matter.
I agree. Lafarge here is drk grey...Holcim is a lighter grey and effects the colour less
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